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AI Enabling Technologies: A Survey

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the opportunity to revolutionize the way the United States Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC) address the challenges of evolving threats, data deluge, and rapid courses of action. Developing an end-to-end artificial intelligence system involves parallel development of different pieces that must work together in order to provide capabilities that can be used by decision makers, warfighters and analysts. These pieces include data collection, data conditioning, algorithms, computing, robust artificial intelligence, and human-machine teaming. While much of the popular press today surrounds advances in algorithms and computing, most modern AI systems leverage advances across numerous different fields. Further, while certain components may not be as visible to end-users as others, our experience has shown that each of these interrelated components play a major role in the success or failure of an AI system. This article is meant to highlight many of these technologies that are involved in an end-to-end AI system. The goal of this article is to provide readers with an overview of terminology, technical details and recent highlights from academia, industry and government. Where possible, we indicate relevant resources that can be used for further reading and understanding.


Fast and Scalable Machine Learning in R and Python with H2O

#artificialintelligence

The focus of this talk is scalable machine learning using the H2O R and Python packages. H2O is an open source distributed machine learning platform designed for big data, with the added benefit that it's easy to use on a laptop (in addition to a multi-node Hadoop or Spark cluster). The core machine learning algorithms of H2O are implemented in high-performance Java; however, fully featured APIs are available in R, Python, Scala, REST/JSON and also through a web interface. Since H2O's algorithm implementations are distributed, this allows the software to scale to very large datasets that may not fit into RAM on a single machine. H2O currently features distributed implementations of generalized linear models, gradient boosting machines, random forest, deep neural nets, dimensionality reduction methods (PCA, GLRM), clustering algorithms (K-means), and anomaly detection methods, among others.


Intro to Machine Learning in H2O

#artificialintelligence

The focus of this workshop is machine learning using the H2O R and Python packages. H2O is an open source distributed machine learning platform designed for big data, with the added benefit that it's easy to use on a laptop (in addition to a multi-node Hadoop or Spark cluster). The core machine learning algorithms of H2O are implemented in high-performance Java; however, fully featured APIs are available in R, Python, Scala, REST/JSON and also through a web interface. Since H2O's algorithm implementations are distributed, this allows the software to scale to very large datasets that may not fit into RAM on a single machine. H2O currently features distributed implementations of generalized linear models, gradient boosting machines, random forest, deep neural nets, dimensionality reduction methods (PCA, GLRM), clustering algorithms (K-means), and anomaly detection methods, among others.


Wavelet-based Temporal Forecasting Models of Human Activities for Anomaly Detection

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This paper presents a novel approach for temporal modelling of long-term human activities based on wavelet transforms. The model is applied to binary smart-home sensors to forecast their signals, which are used then as temporal priors to infer anomalies in office and Active & Assisted Living (AAL) scenarios. Such inference is performed by a new extension of Hybrid Markov Logic Networks (HMLNs) that merges different anomaly indicators, including activity levels detected by sensors, expert rules and the new temporal models. The latter in particular allow the inference system to discover deviations from long-term activity patterns, which cannot by detected by simpler frequency-based models. Two new publicly available datasets were collected using several smart-sensors to evaluate the wavelet-based temporal models and their application to signal forecasting and anomaly detection. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques and their successful application to detect unexpected activities in office and AAL settings.