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IBM Watson AI: These firms are fighting cybercrime using cognitive computing

ZDNet

IBM Watson is set to take the fight to cybercrime. Fortune 500 companies across the globe are tackling cybercrime by deploying IBM Watson's cognitive computing power. Watson for Cyber Security, a project designed to take the fight to hackers, is a year-long research effort that initially was focused around universities but has been extended to various industries, including banking, healthcare, insurance, and automotive. Using artificial intelligence technologies, such as machine learning and natural language processing, to analyse vast amounts of structured and unstructured data, Watson is designed to help cybersecurity professionals identify threats. Marburg Hospital's Centre for the Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases is using the cognitive computing system to solve some of the most complex medical cases.


A modern solution for a modern problem: IBM tackles cyber security

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IBM is tackling modern security issues with a modern approach: cognitive technology. As part of a year long research project, IBM is rolling out Watson for Cyber Security, a new cloud-based version of the company's cognitive tech that focuses on the language of security. IBM Watson is the organisation's technology platform that uses natural language processing and machine learning to reveal insights from large amounts of unstructured data. According to a statement, IBM is teaming up with eight universities around the United States to further scale the system and expand the collection of security data that Watson is currently trained with. According to IBM, training for Watson for Cyber Security is a crucial step in the advancement of cognitive security.


Lie back and think of cybersecurity: IBM lets students loose on Watson

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IBM is teaming up with eight North American universities to further tune its cognitive system to tackle cybersecurity problems. Watson for Cyber Security, a platform already in pre-beta, will be further trained in "learning the nuances of security research findings and discovering patterns and evidence of hidden cyber attacks and threats that could otherwise be missed". IBM will work with eight US universities from autumn onwards for a year in order to push forward the project. The universities selected are California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; Pennsylvania State University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; New York University; the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC); the University of New Brunswick; the University of Ottawa; and the University of Waterloo. The project is ultimately designed to bridge the cyber-security skills gap, a perennial issue in the industry.


IBM's Watson is off to cybersecurity school - TechCentral.ie

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It is no secret that much of the wisdom of the world lies in unstructured data, that is the kind that is not necessarily quantifiable and tidy. So it is in cybersecurity, and now IBM is putting Watson to work to make that knowledge more accessible. Towards that end, IBM Security has announced a new year-long research project through which it will collaborate with eight universities to help train its Watson artificial-intelligence system to tackle cybercrime. Knowledge about threats is often hidden in unstructured sources such as blogs, research reports and documentation, said Kevin Skapinetz, director of strategy for IBM Security. "Let's say tomorrow there's an article about a new type of malware, then a bunch of follow-up blogs," Skapinetz explained.


IBM's Watson is going to cybersecurity school

#artificialintelligence

It's no secret that much of the wisdom of the world lies in unstructured data, or the kind that's not necessarily quantifiable and tidy. So it is in cybersecurity, and now IBM is putting Watson to work to make that knowledge more accessible. Towards that end, IBM Security on Tuesday announced a new year-long research project through which it will collaborate with eight universities to help train its Watson artificial intelligence system to tackle cybercrime. Knowledge about threats is often hidden in unstructured sources such as blogs, research reports and documentation, said Kevin Skapinetz, director of strategy for IBM Security. "Let's say tomorrow there's an article about a new type of malware, then a bunch of follow-up blogs," Skapinetz explained.