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GE's research scientists are learning to meld AI with machines

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When Jason Nichols joined GE Global Research in 2011, soon after completing postdoctoral work in organic chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, he anticipated a long career in chemical research. But after four years creating materials and systems to treat industrial wastewater, Nichols moved to the company's machine-learning lab. This year he began working with augmented reality. Part chemist, part data scientist, Nichols is now exactly the type of hybrid employee crucial to the future of a company working to inject artificial intelligence into its machines and industrial processes. Fifteen years ago, GE's machine operators and technicians monitored its aircraft engines, locomotives, and gas turbines by listening to their clanks and whirs and checking their gauges.


How GE software is making its mark on the Industrial Internet

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In 2011, Marc Andreessen famously asserted, "Software is eating the world." Jeff Immelt, CEO and chairman of General Electric (GE) took that to heart. He has made no bones about the fact that all industrial companies will have to become software and analytics companies. As a result, GE has begun looking to Web 2.0 companies like Google and Amazon for inspiration. "The digital transformation at GE has helped anticipate the needs of a technology-driven society, and it has been both rapid and dramatic," Colin Parris, vice president for Software Research, GE Global Research, wrote last week.


Real or virtual? The two faces of machine learning

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There's a lot of sci-fi-level buzz lately about smart machines and software bots that will use big data and the Internet of things to become autonomous actors, such as to schedule your personal tasks, drive your car or a delivery truck, manage your finances, ensure compliance with and adjust your medical activities, build and perhaps even design cars and smartphones, and of course connect you to the products and services that it decides you should use. But there's another path that gets much less attention: the real world. It too uses AI, analytics, big data, and the Internet of things (aka the industrial Internet in this context), though not in the same manner. Whether you're looking to choose a next-frontier career path or simply understand what's going on in technology, it's important to note the differences. A recent conversation with Colin Parris, the chief scientist at manufacturing giant General Electric, crystalized in my mind the different paths that the combination of machine learning, big data, and IoT are on.


The Industrial Internet Of Things Will Predict And Eliminate Points Of Failure - ARC

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Data is the currency of the Internet of Things. The ability to predict the outcomes of that data for contextualized outcomes will eventually transform the infrastructure of the world. Modern machines are now generating self-aware data on a continual basis. Engineers, developers, scientists and researchers are just now beginning to build the processes that will allow people to harness that data and turn it into automated, contextual and powerful decisions. The problem is most industrial-based enterprises have, as yet, failed to appreciate that data provides answers to potential problems and insights into how more efficient their assets could be.


The Industrial Internet Of Things Will Predict And Eliminate Points Of Failure - ARC

#artificialintelligence

Data is the currency of the Internet of Things. The ability to predict the outcomes of that data for contextualized outcomes will eventually transform the infrastructure of the world. Modern machines are now generating self-aware data on a continual basis. Engineers, developers, scientists and researchers are just now beginning to build the processes that will allow people to harness that data and turn it into automated, contextual and powerful decisions. The problem is most industrial-based enterprises have, as yet, failed to appreciate that data provides answers to potential problems and insights into how more efficient their assets could be.