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Data science could help Californians battle future wildfires -- GCN

#artificialintelligence

A major wildfire spread through Colorado, and I spent long hours locating shelters, identifying evacuation routes and piecing together satellite imagery. As the Fourmile Canyon Fire devastated areas to the west of Boulder, ultimately destroying 169 homes and causing US$217 million in damage, my biggest concerns were ensuring that people could safely evacuate and first responders had the best chance of keeping the fire at bay. I spent it sitting comfortably in my home in Bloomington, Indiana, a thousand miles away from the action. I was a volunteer, trying to help fire victims. I had created a webpage to aggregate data about the fire, including the location of shelters and the latest predictions of fire spread.


Data science could reshape climate change disaster response

#artificialintelligence

A major wildfire spread through Colorado, and I spent long hours locating shelters, identifying evacuation routes and piecing together satellite imagery. As the Fourmile Canyon Fire devastated areas to the west of Boulder, ultimately destroying 169 homes and causing $217 million in damage, my biggest concerns were ensuring that people could safely evacuate and first responders had the best chance of keeping the fire at bay. I spent it sitting comfortably in my home in Bloomington, Indiana, a thousand miles away from the action. I was a volunteer, trying to help fire victims. I had created a webpage to aggregate data about the fire, including the location of shelters and the latest predictions of fire spread.


Using AI and IoT for disaster management

#artificialintelligence

In countries around the world, natural disasters have been much in the news. If you had a hunch such calamities were increasing, you're right. In 2017, hurricanes, earthquakes, and wildfires cost $306 billion worldwide, nearly double 2016's losses of $188 billion. Natural disasters caused by climate change, extreme weather, and aging and poorly designed infrastructure, among other risks, represent a significant risk to human life and communities. Globally, $94 trillion in new investment is needed to keep pace with population growth, with a large portion of that going toward repair of the built environment.


Data was the new oil, until the oil caught fire – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

We've been hearing how "data is the new oil" for more than a decade now, and in certain sectors, it's a maxim that has more than panned out. From marketing and logistics to finance and product, decision-making is now dominated by data at all levels of most big private orgs (and if it isn't, I'd be getting a résumé put together, stat). So it might be a something of a surprise to learn that data, which could transform how we respond to the increasingly deadly disasters that regularly plague us, has been all but absent from much of emergency response this past decade. Far from being a geyser of digital oil, disaster response agencies and private organizations alike have for years tried to swell the scope and scale of the data being inputted into disaster response, with relatively meager results. That's starting to change though, mostly thanks to the internet of things (IoT), and frontline crisis managers today increasingly have the data they need to make better decisions across the resilience, response, and recovery cycle.


Data was the new oil, until the oil caught fire – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

We've been hearing how "data is the new oil" for more than a decade now, and in certain sectors, it's a maxim that has more than panned out. From marketing and logistics to finance and product, decision-making is now dominated by data at all levels of most big private orgs (and if it isn't, I'd be getting a resume put together, stat). So it might be a something of a surprise to learn that data, which could transform how we respond to the increasingly deadly disasters that regularly plague us, has been all but absent from much of emergency response this past decade. Far from being a geyser of digital oil, disaster response agencies and private organizations alike have for years tried to swell the scope and scale of the data being inputted into disaster response, with relatively meager results. That's starting to change though, mostly thanks to the internet of things (IoT), and frontline crisis managers today increasingly have the data they need to make better decisions across the resilience, response and recovery cycle.