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Stephen Colbert showed Steve Buscemi that Jennifer Lawrence deepfake video and he has mixed feelings

Mashable

How do you do, fellow kids? Steve Buscemi had some thoughts about the latest viral "deepfake" video that's been floating around. You know the one: It's Steve Buscemi's face creepily pasted onto Jennifer Lawrence's body. Speaking to Stephen Colbert on Wednesday night, a befuddled Buscemi deadpanned, "I've never looked better." He added, "It makes me sad that somebody spent that much time on that."


'Deepfakes' are becoming more realistic, and could signal the next wave of attacks on politicians

#artificialintelligence

When Peter Cushing turned to face the camera in Rogue One, Star Wars fans were as excited as they were confused. After all, the actor had died more than 20 years earlier, and yet, there was no mistaking him. For a major Hollywood movie, this is a clever trick. But not everyone is trying to entertain us, and you don't need a million-dollar budget to deceive. "You take the face of one person and put it on the body of another," said Jeff Smith, associate director at the National Center for Media Forensics at the University of Colorado Denver.


Creepy and lifelike deepfake videos could be commonplace 'within six months', claims expert

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Deepfake videos could be commonplace and found across the media and online platforms within six months, according to a leading expert. The idea of the videos is to look completely real and show people doing things they never did. These are created by complex computing and artificial intelligence and have caused outrage recently. Moving images can be created from just a single image of a person and US politician Nancy Pelosi, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and even the Mona Lisa have been used in the convincing clips already. The video that kicked off the concern last month was a doctored video of Nancy Pelosi (pictured), the speaker of the US House of Representatives.


Researchers unveil new tool to pinpoint unnatural movements that helps suss out deepfakes

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The fight against videos altered by the use of artificial intelligence just got a new ally. According to researchers at UC Berkeley and the University of Southern California, a new algorithm can help spot whether a video has been manipulated via a process known as'deepfaking.' Counter-intuitively, the tool that scientists say will aid them in their crusade against faked videos happens to be the very same tool that helps make the videos in the first place: artificial intelligence. The fight against videos altered by the use of artificial intelligence just got a new ally. Pictured is a grab from a deep fake video where Steve Buscemi's face is superimposed over Jennifer Lawrence's body Deepfakes are so named because they utilize deep learning, a form of artificial intelligence, to create fake videos.


Wait, is that video real? The race against deepfakes and dangers of manipulated recordings

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Deepfakes are video manipulations that can make people say seemingly strange things. Barack Obama and Nicolas Cage have been featured in these videos. It used to take a lot of time and expertise to realistically falsify videos. For decades, authentic-looking video renderings were only seen in big-budget sci-fi movies films like "Star Wars." However, thanks to the rise in artificial intelligence, doctoring footage has become more accessible than ever, which researchers say poses a threat to national security.