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Thermal camera with face detection tech for fever screening procured in Kerala

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The first Thermal and Optical Imaging camera with Artificial Intelligence-powered face detection technology for fever screening has been procured for the state capital by former Union Minister Shashi Tharoor. Following a discussion, his team had with district collector K Gopalakrishnan, Congress leader Tharoor said it was brought to his notice that a Thermal imaging camera with face detection technology was urgently needed in the district to scan from a safe distance and isolate those potentially having fever. Using his MPLADS fund, Tharoor, who represents, Thiruvananthapuram in the Lok Sabha, procured the equipment. Bahrain and Dubai before finally reaching Bengaluru, from where it was shipped to Kerala, Tharoor said in a Facebook Post. "The installation will be done at our Airport, Railway Station, MCH. Since all MPLADS funds have been exhausted, we are approaching other corporate groups to partner with us and the district administration to procure more of this highly sophisticated technological device prior to the huge influx of expatriates from the middle east and other areas overseas,"


Real-life Robocop starts work in Dubai tomorrow onward

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The world's first robocop has been unveiled in Dubai and will be patrolling streets from tomorrow onward. The 5 ft 5in tall robot can read facial expressions and will be used by members of the public to report crime and pay traffic fines. Multi-lingual crime-fighting robots will make up a quarter of the city's police force by 2030, according to officials. Real-life RoboCops will be patrolling the streets of Dubai alongside police. The android, which is equipped with face recognition technology, will be used by members of the public to report crime and pay traffic fines.


Tech companies in China and U.S. are vying to sell facial recognition software for UAE spy program

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As lawmakers, citizens, and company's debate the use of facial recognition software in the U.S., tech giants in America and China have been busy hawking products to eager surveillance states abroad. Among the burgeoning markets, according to a report by Buzzfeed News, are monarchies in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), particularly in Dubai, where political leaders have often jailed citizens and journalists that they deem to be political dissidents. Critics of the UAE include Human Rights Watch (HRW) who has frequently derided the country for its authoritarian tendencies. Private companies like IBM are looking to governments accused of violating human rights as a market for facial recognition software. 'UAE authorities have launched a sustained assault on freedom of expression and association since 2011,' says HRW in its analysis.


Clearview AI exposes source code to controversial facial recognition app and company credentials

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Security researchers say a misconfigured server owned by the controversial facial recognition company, Clearview AI, exposed its software's source code as well as internal credentials and keys. According to TechCrunch, which first reported on the flaw, Mossab Hussein, the chief security officer at SpiderSilk, a security firm based in Dubai, uncovered a flawed Clearview server storing sensitive data, allowing users to bypass its password protection. Specifically, Hussein found that a misconfiguration allowed anyone to register as a new user and access the database containing Clearview's code regardless of whether they had entered password. TechCrunch reports that, in addition to source code that would allow anyone to use Clearview's software, the database also contained passwords and other keys that would allow one to access the company's cloud storage buckets. Finished versions of Clearview's apps for iOS and Android as well as pre-developer beta versions were contained in those buckets, TechCrunch reports.


Security lapse exposed Clearview AI source code – TechCrunch

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Since it exploded onto the scene in January after a newspaper exposé, Clearview AI quickly became one of the most elusive, secretive and reviled companies in the tech startup scene. The controversial facial recognition startup allows its law enforcement users to take a picture of a person, upload it and match it against its alleged database of 3 billion images, which the company scraped from public social media profiles. But for a time, a misconfigured server exposed the company's internal files, apps and source code for anyone on the internet to find. Mossab Hussein, chief security officer at Dubai-based cybersecurity firm SpiderSilk, found the repository storing Clearview's source code. Although the repository was protected with a password, a misconfigured setting allowed anyone to register as a new user to log in to the system storing the code.