AlphaGo Wins Final Game In Match Against Champion Go Player

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

AlphaGo, a largely self-taught Go-playing AI, last night won the fifth and final game in a match held in Seoul, South Korea, against that country's Lee Sedol. Sedol is one of the greatest modern players of the ancient Chinese game. The final score was 4 games to 1. Thus falls the last and computationally hardest game that programmers have taken as a test of machine intelligence. Chess, AI's original touchstone, fell to the machines 19 years ago, but Go had been expected to last for many years to come. The sweeping victory means far more than the US 1 million prize, which Google's London-based acquisition, DeepMind, says it will give to charity.


IoT and artificial intelligence at Bosch ConnectedWorld Chicago

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Until recently, artificial intelligence (AI) was primarily limited to computer chess players and jeopardy. In the last few years, however, the pace of innovation in AI has skyrocketed, driven by tipping points in algorithms, processing (GPUs), and increasing volumes of data. While there is an infinite set of use cases for AI, the Internet of Things is a particularly interesting breeding ground for new AI-driven solutions and experiences, from self-driving cars to intelligent homes to mHealth. In this talk at Bosch ConnectedWorld Chicago, MongoDB's Dev Ittycheria discusses how the massive increase in data driven by sensors will drive the next wave of innovation in AI.


When AI rules the world: what SF novels tell us about our future overlords

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It's only March and already we've seen a computer beat a Go grandmaster and a self-driving car crash into a bus. The world is waking up to the ways in which a combination of "deep learning" artificial intelligence and robotics will take over most jobs. But if we don't want our robot servants to rise up and kill us in our beds, maybe we should delete the video of us beating their grandparents with hockey sticks. Thanks to science fiction, we know that the first thing AI will do is take over the defence grid and nuke us all. In Harlan Ellison's 1967 story I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream – one of the most brutal depictions of an AI-dominated world – an AI called AM, constructed to fight a nuclear war, kills off most of the human race, keeping five people as playthings.


AlphaGo, Deep Learning, and the Future of the Human Microscopist

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In March of last year, Google's (Menlo Park, California) artificial intelligence (AI) computer program AlphaGo beat the best Go player in the world, 18-time champion Lee Se-dol, in a tournament, winning 4 of 5 games.1 At first glance this news would seem of little interest to a pathologist, or to anyone else for that matter. After all, many will remember that IBM's (Armonk, New York) computer program Deep Blue beat Garry Kasparov--at the time the greatest chess player in the world--and that was 19 years ago. The rules of the several-thousand-year-old game of Go are extremely simple. The board consists of 19 horizontal and 19 vertical black lines.


Baidu to use cloud computing, AI to ramp up behavioural analysis

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Chinese internet giant Baidu says it plans to leverage advanced cloud-computing to analyse the online data of millions of its users to help companies improve their marketing campaigns. The Chinese search engine giant, which has real-time search data on more than 700 million internet users, is able to analyse individual users through its cloud arm's artificial intelligence (AI), big data and cloud computing technologies, Yin Shiming, vice president and general manager of Baidu Cloud Computing, said in Shenzhen. "AI is bringing in new ways of thinking for many traditional industries," said Yin, who cited the recent battle between Google DeepMind's AlphaGo computer program and Chinese Go master Ke Jie as supporting his view that the development of AI technology has stepped up. "Our Marketing Cloud, backed by Baidu Cloud's data and technology, is not just saving resources and costs, but making marketing easier," Yin said. Despite challenges from other local search brands such as Sogou and Qihoo 360, Baidu's dominance in online search has hardly swayed over the years, accounting for about 75 per cent of the search market.