Lie back and think of cybersecurity: IBM lets students loose on Watson

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IBM is teaming up with eight North American universities to further tune its cognitive system to tackle cybersecurity problems. Watson for Cyber Security, a platform already in pre-beta, will be further trained in "learning the nuances of security research findings and discovering patterns and evidence of hidden cyber attacks and threats that could otherwise be missed". IBM will work with eight US universities from autumn onwards for a year in order to push forward the project. The universities selected are California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; Pennsylvania State University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; New York University; the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC); the University of New Brunswick; the University of Ottawa; and the University of Waterloo. The project is ultimately designed to bridge the cyber-security skills gap, a perennial issue in the industry.


Autonomous Cars, LiDAR, and Artificial Intelligence, Oh, My! A Look at CES 2017

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The Consumer Electronics Show, one of the world's tentpole technology shows, is a flashy vehicle for the engineering underneath. In the world of chipsets, the show was dominated by Nvidia, one of many companies seeking to power the artificial intelligence in next-generation cars and image processors. There were also plenty of opportunities for component manufacturers to find places in the flashy new cars and fleets that dominated some of the show floors. Chipmakers and sensor manufacturers are also keeping an eye on what customers want in the automotive space. Just seven states – Nevada, California, Florida, Michigan, Hawaii, Washington, and Tennessee -- and the District of Columbia have passed bills related to autonomous driving.


Sprint's 5G wireless launch, planned for May, could be the country's first

Washington Post - Technology News

Sprint customers in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and Kansas City will be among the first to test the company's 5G wireless network when it launches in May, executives said Monday. Expect an additional five markets -- Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix and Washington, D.C. -- to come online by the first half of the year, said Sprint chief executive Michel Combes. The impending launch could make Sprint the first U.S. wireless carrier to offer a mass-market 5G service for smartphones in a global race to provide faster download speeds and support for new applications such as self-driving cars. Customers of Google Fi, the wireless service run by Google on Sprint's network, will be able to connect to Sprint's 5G capabilities, as well, Combes said -- though it is unclear when Google Fi customers will gain access to 5G smartphones that can take advantage of the new technology. Company officials declined to say how Sprint's 5G plans will be sold to consumers, or at what price.


The Future Of AI With Alexy Khrabrov

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FILE - In this May 13, 2015, file photo, Google's self-driving Lexus drives along a street during a demonstration at Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. While the Boston region is a center for robotics and artificial intelligence research, none of the Northeast states allows self-driving cars to be driven or tested on public roads. But Massachusetts officials are looking in 2016 at turning part of the former Devens military base into a self-driving testing ground. He wants to show you, immerse you and get you as excited as he is. The founder and CEO of By the Bay and Chief Scientist at the Cicero Institute has made a career out of not only understanding and developing AI, but bringing startups and enterprises into the fold, as well, with his developer meetups and conferences through AI By the Bay.


Nvidia Beats Earnings Estimates As Its Artificial Intelligence Business Keeps On Booming

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Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang introducing the Nvidia Spot, a USD 49.95 microphone and speaker that will let owners use Google Assistant anywhere in a home, at the company's CES 2017 keynote (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images) Nvidia continued to see demand for its graphics processors in the emerging world of artificial intelligence in its fourth quarter earnings reported Thursday. In its fourth quarter earnings release, the Santa Clara, Calif.-based company reported revenue of $2.17 billion, up 55% year over year, on earnings per share of $1.13, up 117% a year ago. Wall Street analysts estimated $2.11 billion in revenue on EPS of 83 cents. Traditionally, the company's processors have been mostly used to power the latest gaming graphics, but the chips have become popular to run AI software in the data center and autonomous vehicles. A specific branch of AI, called deep learning, is where Nvidia's processors particularly shine.