Kerry makes gut-wrenching visit to Hiroshima site of atomic bomb

PBS NewsHour

Secretary of State John Kerry, center, puts his arm around Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida after they and fellow G7 foreign ministers laid wreaths at the cenotaph at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and Museum in Hiroshima. HIROSHIMA, Japan -- An emotional John Kerry said Hiroshima's horrible history should teach humanity to avoid conflict and strive to eradicate nuclear weapons as he became the first U.S. secretary of state to tread upon the ground of the world's first atomic bombing. Kerry's visit Monday to the Japanese city included him touring its peace museum with other foreign ministers of the Group of Seven industrialized nations and laying a wreath at the adjoining park's stone-arched monument, with the exposed steel beams of Hiroshima's iconic A-Bomb Dome in the distance. The U.S. attack on Hiroshima in the final days of World War II killed 140,000 people and scarred a generation of Japanese, while thrusting the world into the dangerous Atomic Age. But Kerry hoped his trip would underscore how Washington and Tokyo have forged a deep alliance over the last 71 years and how everyone must ensure that nuclear arms are never used again.


Kerry makes gut-wrenching visit to Hiroshima site of A-bomb

Associated Press

Kerry's visit Monday to the Japanese city included him touring its peace museum with other foreign ministers of the Group of Seven industrialized nations and laying a wreath at the adjoining park's stone-arched monument, with the exposed steel beams of Hiroshima's iconic A-Bomb Dome in the distance. The U.S. attack on Hiroshima in the final days of World War II killed 140,000 people and scarred a generation of Japanese, while thrusting the world into the dangerous Atomic Age. "While we will revisit the past and honor those who perished, this trip is not about the past," he told Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, a Hiroshima native. Kerry's appearance, just footsteps away from Ground Zero, completed an evolution for the United States, whose leaders avoided the city for many years because of political sensitivities.


Kerry makes gut-wrenching visit to Hiroshima site of A-bomb

Associated Press

Kerry's emotional visit Monday to the Japanese city included him touring its peace museum with other foreign ministers of the Group of Seven industrialized nations and laying a wreath at the adjoining park's stone-arched monument, with the exposed steel beams of Hiroshima's iconic A-Bomb Dome in the distance. The U.S. attack on Hiroshima in the final days of World War II killed 140,000 people and scarred a generation of Japanese, while thrusting the world into the dangerous Atomic Age. "While we will revisit the past and honor those who perished, this trip is not about the past," he told Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, a Hiroshima native. Kerry's appearance, just footsteps away from Ground Zero, completed an evolution for the United States, whose leaders avoided the city for many years because of political sensitivities.


Kerry becomes highest-ranking U.S. official to visit Hiroshima memorial

Mashable

SEE ALSO: Seoul and Japan are ready to shoot down North Korea's rocket debris Kerry became the most senior American official ever to visit the site, touring the city's Peace Memorial Park and Museum with other foreign ministers of the Group of Seven industrialized nations. Honored to be 1st Sec State to visit Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum & Park. Here is what I wrote in the guestbook. Shortly before the scheduled event, Kerry called it "a moment that I hope will underscore to the world the importance of peace and the importance of strong allies working together to make the world safer and, ultimately, we hope to be able to rid the world of weapons of mass destruction." "It's about the present and the future particularly, and the strength of the relationship that we have built, the friendship that we share, the strength of our alliance and the strong reminder of the imperative we all have to work for peace for peoples everywhere."


No apology sought for A-bombings, Kishida says

The Japan Times

With U.S. President Barack Obama expected to visit Hiroshima after the Group of Seven (G-7) summit in Mie Prefecture next month, Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said Japan has informed the United States that it is not seeking an apology for the atomic bombings that took place during the war. "We're not asking for an apology," Kishida said in a speech in Hokkaido on Saturday. Senior U.S. officials said Friday that Obama is likely to become the first sitting American president to make a visit to Hiroshima. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry visited Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park earlier this month along with other G-7 foreign ministers, becoming the first U.S. secretary of state to do so while in office. Kishida said that before Kerry's visit, Japan informed the U.S. government of its position, underscoring that "a tragedy for mankind should not be repeated" and that "we hope (Kerry) would visit Hiroshima to confirm our desire to create a world without nuclear weapons."