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Decoding Nature's Soundtrack - Issue 38: Noise

Nautilus

One of most immediately striking features about Bernie Krause is his glasses. They're big--not soda-bottle thick, but unusually large, and draw attention to his eyes. Which is ironic, as Krause's life has been devoted to what he hears, but also appropriate, since it's the weakness of his eyes that compelled Krause to engage with sound: first with music, and later the music of nature. Nearsighted and astigmatic, Krause has spent most of the last half-century recording biological symphonies to which most of us are deaf. Even more than Krause sees, he listens.


The Dawn Chorus is getting QUIETER due to climate change

Daily Mail - Science & tech

There are few things more tranquil than the beautifully melodic sound of early-morning bird song. But a major new study has revealed that dawn choruses across North America and Europe are now becoming quieter and less varied because of climate change. Researchers said the intensity of bird song has reduced over the last 25 years as warming temperatures have shifted the distribution of species. Melodies: Dawn choruses across North America and Europe are now becoming quieter and less varied because of climate change. A study led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) used a new technique to reconstruct the soundscapes of more than 200,000 sites over the span of a generation.


Oceans Aren't Just Warming--Their Soundscapes Are Transforming

Mother Jones

This story was originally published in Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Wander into nature and give a good shout, and only nearby birds, frogs, and squirrels will hear you. Although sensing noise is a critical survival strategy for land animals, it's a somewhat limited warning system, as sounds--save for something like a massive volcanic explosion--don't travel far in the air. Those conditions are rapidly transforming as the oceans warm. Changes in salinity, temperature, and pressure change how the sea sounds, with unknown impacts on the life forms that depend on that noise to survive.


Oceans Aren't Just Warming--Their Soundscapes Are Transforming

WIRED

Wander into nature and give a good shout, and only nearby birds, frogs, and squirrels will hear you. Although sensing noise is a critical survival strategy for land animals, it's a somewhat limited warning system, as sounds--save for something like a massive volcanic explosion--don't travel far in air. Those conditions are rapidly transforming as the oceans warm. Changes in salinity, temperature, and pressure change how the sea sounds, with unknown impacts on the life-forms that depend on that noise to survive. Whales talk amongst themselves and navigate with Earth's tones by listening to waves breaking on shorelines.


Could listening to the deep sea help save it?

The Japan Times

You might know what a hydrothermal vent looks like: black plumes billowing from deep-sea pillars encrusted with tube worms, hairy crabs, pouting fish. But do you know what it sounds like? To the untrained ear, a hydrothermal vent -- or more precisely, one vent from the Suiyo Seamount southeast of Japan -- generates a viscous, muffled burbling that recalls an ominous pool of magma or a simmering pot of soup. To the trained ear, the Suiyo vent sounds like many things. When asked during a Zoom call to describe the Suiyo recording more scientifically, Tzu-Hao Lin, a research fellow at the Biodiversity Research Center at Academia Sinica in Taipei, Taiwan, took a long pause, shrugged and laughed.