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PlayStation finally offers better password security, five years after hack

Mashable

PlayStation Network now allows users to better secure their accounts with the rollout of an optional two-factor authentication process. Widely used by other, more secure services, the measure amounts to the digital version carrying two forms of identification. In the case of PSN, your password is the first step and a code texted to your mobile device is the second. The texted code applies specifically to sign-ins on PC. For PlayStation consoles and handhelds -- as well as "some mobile phones" -- PSN users with two-factor authentication active need to generate device-specific passwords.


Easy-to-guess default device passwords are a step closer to being banned

ZDNet

Easy-to-guess default passwords will be banned and smart device manufacturers will be required to tell customers how long their new product will receive security updates under plans to protect Internet of Things (IoT) devices and their users from cyberattacks. Laws will also require manufacturers of smart devices including phones, doorbells, cameras, speakers, TVs and more to provide a public point of contact to make it simpler for security vulnerabilities in the products to be reported – and fixed with software updates. Households and businesses are increasingly connecting IoT products to their networks – but while they're being deployed with the aim of providing benefits, insecure IoT devices can be exploited by cyber criminals. That can lead to malicious hackers using insecure smart devices as a stepping stone onto corporate or personal networks and using that access as a means of conducting cyberattacks, as well as potentially invading the privacy of users. In an effort to protect smart devices, the UK government's department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has announced the the need for IoT devices to be Secure by Design will become law.


Best password managers: Reviews of the top products

PCWorld

We are terrible at passwords. We suck at creating them (the top two most popular remain "123456" and "password"), we share them way too freely, and we forget them all the time. Indeed, the very thing that can ensure our online security has become our biggest obstacle to it. This is what makes a good password manager essential. It allows you to safely share those logins with others when necessary.


Best password managers: Reviews and buying advice

PCWorld

We are terrible at passwords. We suck at creating them (the top two most popular remain "123456" and "password"), we share them way too freely, and we forget them all the time. Indeed, the very thing that can ensure our online security has become out biggest obstacle to it. This is what makes a good password manager essential. It allows you to safely share those logins with others when necessary.


Fire TV setup no longer requires typing in a Wi-Fi password

Mashable

One of the most tedious parts of setting up a new media streaming device is the requirement to enter your Wi-Fi password. The stronger your password is, the more tedious this process becomes. For Amazon Fire TV $49.99 at Amazon devices, the password entry step is no longer required thanks to a software update. Alongside frustration-free packaging, Amazon offers frustration-free setup for some of its smart devices. Part of that is Wi-Fi simple setup, which allows your Wi-Fi password(s) to be stored in your Amazon account.