Love Is An Evolutionary Response To Better Reproduction Rates: Study

International Business Times

Why do we fall in love? This universal feeling of attraction has posed one of the most baffling queries for scientists, who have struggled long to determine the biological purpose of love and why exactly we fall for one and other.


Love at first sight more likely about physical attraction

Daily Mail - Science & tech

When asked about the moment he knew Meghan Markle was the one, Prince Harry claimed the realization struck'the very first time we met.'


Why humans have big penises - but small testicles

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Humans have a much longer and wider penis than the other great apes. Even the largest of gorillas, more than twice as heavy as a human, will have a penis just two and half inches long when erect. A chimpanzee's testes weigh more than a third of its brain while ours weigh in at less than 3%. The relative size of our penis and testes is all down to our mating strategies, and can provide some surprising insights into early human culture. Primates exhibit all sorts of mating behaviour, including monogamous, polygynous – where males have multiple mates – and multimale-multifemale.


What's the point of marriage? To avoid STIs! Humans only started getting wed when farming spread to stop sexual diseases wiping out populations

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Most people would count getting married as one of the most romantic steps a couple can take. A wedding day marks the special bond between two people, marking a promise to share their lives together. But the root of marriage can be traced back to nothing more romantic than avoiding sexually transmitted diseases, a new study has revealed. Monogamy is a trait present in just three per cent of mammal species, and for a long time scientists have wondered why it evolved in humans. Now a study shows monogamy emerged in early farmers after'sleeping around', which had been the norm among hunter gatherers, became too risky because of genital herpes and other diseases.


New study claims monogamy may NOT be best

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The idea that monogamy is'the only way' has long been ingrained in Western culture. While scientists have questioned whether this way of life truly is better than non-monogamy, they've yet to reach a consensus – and, new research argues that this is because even scientists have upheld an'invisible' bias on the subject. In the study, researchers reviewed of several earlier works and surveyed more than 2,000 people, and found that non-monogamous relationships are just as'functional' as traditional ones. While scientists have questioned whether this way of life truly is better than non-monogamy, they've yet to reach a consensus – and, new research argues that this is because even scientists have upheld an'invisible' bias on the subject. Of the group surveyed in the new study from the University of Michigan, 617 participants were in consensual non-monogamous (CNM) relationships, according to Quartz.