Rise of the robots: How is the MBA responding?

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Since the application of robotics is largely confined to manufacturing and AI is still in its infancy, the answer now is obviously no. One LinkedIn author recently argued that business schools should be proactive and develop a "Robot MBA" for a future of intelligent non-human workers. Silliness aside, having transformed unskilled jobs, automation is set to disrupt professional life, where MBAs can be a point of differentiation for humans. "The automation we've seen in the last 100 years mostly replaced muscle," says Urs Peyer of Insead. A study by Deloitte and Oxford University found that 35 per cent of current jobs are at high risk of computerisation, with white collar professions among those most under threat.


Law School Scam? 200,000 in Student Debt, Replaced by Job-Killing Robot / Sputnik International

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Law school, the default location for America's brightest unemployed Liberal Arts graduates and the worst decision a 20-something can make in the modern era just became an even worse bargain, if that's possible. We're not talking about a surge in LSAT applicants, beginning in 2008, that led to the creation of InfiLaw Corporation scam-law-schools like Charlotte, Florida Coastal, or Arizona Summit, the latter of which boasts an average bar passage rate of below 31% and an average cost of attendance exceeding 250,000. We are not even speaking about a profession that requires the completion of at least seven years of college,followed by an expensive test and an invasive background check, just for the benefit of staring down the barrel of a 15.5 percent unemployment rate and roughly 200,000 in non-dischargeable student debt. One might even guess that we're talking about how recent studies show that over 40% of law school students suffer from clinical depression, with those unhappy figures only becoming worse as graduates enter a profession with a suicide rate nearly ten times above the national norm. Instead, we are talking about the latest and greatest idea among the old-timers; those old ones who have already won the legal profession lottery, allowing them to seize an upper-middle class lifestyle after matriculating from law schools referred to as'third-tier toilets,' or attending bastions of prestigious opportunity, like Harvard and Yale.


Teaching Computers To Be More Creative Than Humans

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Associate Professor Julian Togelius works at the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and games--a largely unexplored juncture that he has shown can be the site of visionary and mind-expanding research. Could games provide a better AI test bed than robots, which--despite the way they excite public imagination--can be slow, unwieldy and expensive? According to him, the answer is resoundingly yes. "I'm teaching computers to be more creative than humans," he says. Togelius, a member of the NYU Tandon School of Engineering's Department of Computer Science and Engineering, is at the forefront of the study of procedural content generation (PCG)--the process of creating game content (such as levels, maps, rules, and environments) by employing algorithms, rather than direct user input.


Teaching Computers to Play Atari Is A Big Step Toward Bringing Robots Into the Real World

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Google is teaching machines to play Atari games like Space Invaders, Video Pinball, and Breakout. At DeepMind, a Google subsidiary based in Cambridge, England, researchers have built artificial intelligence software that's so adept at these classic games, it can sometimes beat a human player--and a professional, at that. This may seem like a frivolous, if intriguing, pursuit. If a machine can learn to navigate the digital world of a video game, Google says, it eventually could learn to navigate the real world, too. Today, this AI can play Space Invaders.


This mind-reading system can correct a robot's error! Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

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A new brain-computer interface developed by scientists can read a person's thoughts in real time to identify when a robot makes a mistake, an advance that may lead to safer self-driving cars. Most existing brain-computer interface (BCI) require people to train with it and even learn to modulate their thoughts to help the machine understand, researchers said. By relying on brain signals called "error-related potentials" (ErrPs) that occur automatically when humans make a mistake or spot someone else making one, the new approach allows even complete novices to control a robot with their minds. This technology developed by researchers at the Boston University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) may offer intuitive and instantaneous ways of communicating with machines, for applications as diverse as supervising factory robots to controlling robotic prostheses. "When humans and robots work together, you basically have to learn the language of the robot, learn a new way to communicate with it, adapt to its interface," said Joseph DelPreto, a PhD candidate at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).