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robots.net - CES 2011

AITopics Original Links

A series of robotics novelties were showcased at the annual Consumer Electronics Show this week in Las Vegas. Among the most remarkable novelties was a new telepresence robot by iRobot called AVA. The working prototype uses Microsoft Kinect-type sensors for safe navigation. It moves using omniwheels and can be controlled using an ipad mounted on its height-adjustable head or by simply pressing touch sensors around its neck. Another interesting robot was demonstrated by CMU's Quality of Life Technology Center.


Robots fighting wars could be blamed for mistakes on the battlefield

AITopics Original Links

Some argue that robots do not have free will and therefore cannot be held morally accountable for their actions. But UW psychologists are finding that people don't have such a clear-cut view of humanoid robots. The researchers' latest results show that humans apply a moderate amount of morality and other human characteristics to robots that are equipped with social capabilities and are capable of harming humans. In this case, the harm was financial, not life-threatening. But it still demonstrated how humans react to robot errors.


Do You Hold Robots Morally Accountable?: Science Fiction in the News

#artificialintelligence

To figure this out, human subjects were introduced to Robovie, and the robot (being secretly teleoperated) made small talk with them, executing a carefully scripted set of interactions designed to establish that the robot was socially sophisticated and capable to form an increasingly social relationship between robot and human. Then, Robovie asked the subject to play a visual scavenger hunt game, with $20 at stake: the subject would attempt to find at least seven items, and if Robovie judged them to be successful (that's an important bit), within a 2-minute time limit, they'd get the money.


Robot's Delight: Japanese robots rap about their artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

"Robot's Delight – A Lyrical Exposition on Learning by Imitation from Human-Human Interaction" is a video submission that won Best Video at the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2017). The team also provides an in-depth explanation of the techniques and robotics in the video. Although social robots are growing in popularity and technical feasibility, it is still unclear how we can effectively program social behaviors. There are many difficulties in programming social robots -- we need to design hundreds or thousands of dialogue rules, anticipate situations the robot will face, handle common recognition errors, and program the robot to respond to many variations of human speech and behavior. Perhaps most challenging is that we often do not understand the reasoning behind our own behavior and so it is hard to program such implicit knowledge into robots.


Robot's Delight: Japanese robots rap about their artificial intelligence

Robohub

"Robot's Delight – A Lyrical Exposition on Learning by Imitation from Human-Human Interaction" is a video submission that won Best Video at the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2017). The team also provides an in-depth explanation of the techniques and robotics in the video. Although social robots are growing in popularity and technical feasibility, it is still unclear how we can effectively program social behaviors. There are many difficulties in programming social robots -- we need to design hundreds or thousands of dialogue rules, anticipate situations the robot will face, handle common recognition errors, and program the robot to respond to many variations of human speech and behavior. Perhaps most challenging is that we often do not understand the reasoning behind our own behavior and so it is hard to program such implicit knowledge into robots.