Cybersecurity in the Internet of Things is a game of incentives

#artificialintelligence

Cybersecurity was the virtual elephant in the showroom at this month's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Attendees of the annual tech trade show, organized by the Consumer Technology Association, relished the opportunity to experience a future filled with delivery drones, autonomous vehicles, virtual and augmented reality and a plethora of "Internet of things" devices, including fridges, wearables, televisions, routers, speakers, washing machines and even robot home assistants. Given the proliferation of connected devices--already, there are estimated to be at least 6.4 billion--there remains the critical question of how to ensure their security. The cybersecurity challenge posed by the internet of things is unique. The scale of connected devices magnifies the consequences of insecurity.


Sweden tells its citizens to squirrel away hard cash under their beds in case of a cyber attack

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Cashless payments are all the rage but people in Sweden have been told to squirrel away notes and coins in case of a cyber attack on the nation's banks. Digital payments offer convenience for both buyers and sellers alike and the Scandinavian nation has been an eager adopter of the technology. Now, government experts are concerned that people could be left without any money should its computer networks become victim to an attack. Sweden's Civil Contingencies Agency has issued guidance to every household telling residents to stockpile'cash in small denominations' for use in emergencies. The warning will ring alarm bells around the world as developed nations increasingly make the move to a cashless society.


NHS staff trigger Google cyber-defences

BBC News

NHS staff using Google's search engine has triggered one of its cybersecurity defences. NHS Digital confirmed so many NHS staff use the search engine that it had started asking them to take a quiz to verify they were "not a robot". News site the Register reported one NHS Trust had told staff to "use Bing" instead. Google indicated its systems were designed to spot unusual traffic and were working as intended. Detecting suspicious traffic from one network can help defeat potential cyber-attacks, such as attempts to try to overwhelm a website.


Cyber-All-Intel: An AI for Security related Threat Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Keeping up with threat intelligence is a must for a security analyst today. There is a volume of information present in `the wild' that affects an organization. We need to develop an artificial intelligence system that scours the intelligence sources, to keep the analyst updated about various threats that pose a risk to her organization. A security analyst who is better `tapped in' can be more effective. In this paper we present, Cyber-All-Intel an artificial intelligence system to aid a security analyst. It is a system for knowledge extraction, representation and analytics in an end-to-end pipeline grounded in the cybersecurity informatics domain. It uses multiple knowledge representations like, vector spaces and knowledge graphs in a 'VKG structure' to store incoming intelligence. The system also uses neural network models to pro-actively improve its knowledge. We have also created a query engine and an alert system that can be used by an analyst to find actionable cybersecurity insights.


Cybersecurity CEO resigns after threatening to shoot president-elect Trump

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The tech industry leader said those who believe the hype show a "profound lack of empathy." SAN FRANCISCO -- PacketSled's website boasts complete network cybersecurity with "3x threat detection." But the threat board members detected most recently came from the San Diego-based company's founder, Matt Harrigan, who resigned Tuesday after election night boasts he planned to assassinate president-elect Donald Trump. Harrigan took to his Facebook page Nov. 8 as results confirmed Trump's victory to say "I'm going to kill the president. A friend answered, "You just need to get high."