Google Brain co-founder teams with Foxconn to bring AI to factories

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Consumers now experience AI mostly through image recognition to help categorize digital photographs and speech recognition that helps power digital voice assistants such as Apple Inc's Siri or Amazon.com But at a press briefing in San Francisco two days before Ng's Landing.ai In many factories, workers look over parts coming off an assembly line for defects. Ng showed a video in which a worker instead put a circuit board beneath a digital camera connected to a computer and the computer identified a defect in the part. Ng said that while typical computer vision systems might require thousands of sample images to become "trained," Landing.ai's


Google's cloudy image recognition is easily blinded, say boffins

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Google's Cloud Vision API is easily blinded by the addition of a little noise to the images it analyses, say a trio of researchers from the Network Security Lab at the University of Washington, Seattle. Authors Hossein Hosseini, Baicen Xiao and Radha Poovendran have hit arXiv with a pre-press paper titled Google's Cloud Vision API Is Not Robust To Noise (PDF) that says "In essence, we found that by adding noise, we can always force the API to output wrong labels or to fail to detect any face or text within the image." The authors explain that if one can add different types of noise to an image, the Cloud Vision API will always incorrectly analyse the pictures presented to it. The image at the top of this story (or here for m.reg readers) shows the false results the API returned. It doesn;t need to be a lot of noise: the authors found an average of 14.25 per cent "impulse noise" got the job done.


Which company does the best job at image recognition? Microsoft, Amazon, Google, or IBM? ZDNet

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Sometimes recognition software is excellent at correctly categorizing certain types of images but totally fails with others. Some image recognition engines prefer cats over dogs, and some are far more descriptive with their color knowledge. But which is the best overall? Perficient Digital's image recognition accuracy study looked at image recognition -- one of the hottest areas of machine learning. It looked at Amazon AWS Rekognition, Google Vision, IBM Watson, and Microsoft Azure Computer Vision to compare images.


U.S. Air Force invests in Explainable-AI for unmanned aircraft

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Software star-up, Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC), has received funding from the U.S. Air Force to incorporate the company's 3D image recognition technology into unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and drones for aerial image and object recognition. ZAC's in-house image recognition software is based on Explainable-AI (XAI), where computer-generated image results can be understood by human experts. ZAC – based in Potomac, Maryland – is the first to demonstrate XAI, where various attributes and details of 3D objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," says Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," adds Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


US Air Force funds Explainable-AI for UAV tech

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Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC) of Potomac, MD announced on August 27 that it is funded by the US Air Force, to use ZAC's detailed 3D image recognition technology, based on Explainable-AI, for drones (unmanned aerial vehicle or UAV) for aerial image/object recognition. ZAC is the first to demonstrate Explainable-AI, where various attributes and details of 3D (three dimensional) objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," said Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "For complex tasks, such as drone vision, you need ZAC's superior technology to handle detailed 3D image recognition." "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as Deep Convolutional Neural Networks, even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," continued Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.