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Vizio's first OLED TVs are coming this fall, and they're priced to move

PCWorld

Vizio made a splash at CES back in January when it announced that it was jumping into the OLED market, and now the TV manufacturer says its first two OLED 4K TV models will arrive this fall with enticingly affordable price tags. Vizio is also teeing up the rest of its 2020 TV and soundbar lineup, including its new P-Series quantum-dot 4K LCD TVs powered by a revamped image processor, its new flagship Elevate soundbar with swiveling upfiring drivers, and its updated SmartCast 4.0 smart TV software. While Vizio first spilled the beans about its OLED plans back at CES, it's only now serving up more details about its upcoming OLED models. Cutting right to the chase, we're talking two models, both of which are slated for fall: a 65-inch OLED TV for $2,000, and a 55-inch version for $1,300. While a $2,000 TV might sound pricey for Vizio, a brand known for its moderately priced televisions, it's actually a bargain compared to LG's upcoming 65-inch CX-series OLED, which is slated to sell for $2,500.


Vizio M-Series Quantum 4K UHD TV review: Same accurate color, now with upgraded ports

PCWorld

It didn't take long to confirm what I suspected during my Vizio V5-Series review--the slightly more expensive M-Series Quantum offers a far better picture. It's not perfect perfect by any means, but the color is more accurate, and the screen uniformity far outstrips that of the V-Series. If you're shopping mid-range Vizio, the M-Series Quantum is what you want. Skip a couple of lunches to save up the extra cash. The M-Series, including the 55-inch class model M55Q6 that I tested, are 60Hz, 3840 x 2160 (4K UHD), 10-bit TVs.


Vizio's new 4K TV prices start at $230

Engadget

We got a peek at Vizio's new 4K TVs at CES back in January, (Remember January? It was when we still went places and saw people) and now they're closer to rolling out, complete with model numbers and prices. That includes the company's first 4K OLED sets that promise a borderless aesthetic, and of course, the technology's precision lighting control that provides deep blacks and excellent contrast. When the 65- and 55-inch OLEDs go on sale this fall they'll cost $2,000 and $1,300, respectively. Compare that to LG's BX series OLED that cost $2,200 and $1,500 in the same sizes, and you can see that a price war is coming... eventually.


This affordable Vizio TV goes toe-to-toe with the best in its class

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The V-Series' affordability makes it a perfect choice for folks who want to lock down a gigantic, 65-inch (or bigger) TV without cracking $1,000. Its performance is just fair, but it packs some features that are relatively hard to come by in this price bracket. Of course, there's some fine print: Its limited viewing angles make it a less-than-ideal 70- or 75-inch option, its Dolby Vision HDR certification is undercut by a lack of brightness, and Vizio's smart platform isn't nearly as flexible as TVs with Roku baked in. Still, the V-Series packs a ton of value for the price, and it's worthy of consideration for non-fussy shoppers who are just looking to upgrade on a budget. Editor's note: Due to COVID-19 complications, this review leans heavily on test results in lieu of hands-on time with the TV.


Vizio P65-C1 display review: Dolby Vision HDR and an Android remote control

PCWorld

If you're looking for entry into the wonderful world of HDR (High Dynamic Range), you're not going to find a cheaper ticket than the Vizio P-Series displays. Prices start at only 1000 for the 60Hz, 50-inch model, and they're definitely worth a look-see: Dolby Vision HDR viewed on the 2000 (available at Best Buy), 65-inch class P65-C1 reviewed here is a vastly superior experience compared to the average LED/LCD TV with standard dynamic range (SDR); i.e., everything else out there. Vizio's P-Series display with its six-inch Android tablet that serves as the remote and the smarts. Also, because Vizio is positioning the P-Series as part of its SmartCast Internet of Things/smart-home entertainment ecosystem (which is based on Google Cast), the company made some--shall we say--interesting design decisions. Vizio's most interesting decision was to make the P-Series entertainment displays, not smart TVs.