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From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


The ADL Calls Out Steam for Giving Extremists a Pass

WIRED

After the horrifying 2019 shooting at New Zealand's Christchurch mosques, over 100 profiles on the gaming platform Steam paid tribute to the shooter. A digital videogame storefront with some social networking features, Steam isn't the most obvious home for charged political content. But just hours after the shooting, 66 Steam profiles took on the shooter's name. At that time, the Christchurch shooter wasn't the only terrorist commemorated by Steam users; hundreds of Steam pages referenced massacres in Parkland, Isla Vista, and Charleston. Steam publisher Valve removed profiles referencing the Christchurch shooting after Kotaku reached out for comment on an article.


'A Game of Whack-a-Mole.' Why Facebook and Others Are Struggling to Delete Footage of the New Zealand Shooting

TIME - Tech

In an apparent effort to ensure their heinous actions would "go viral," a shooter who murdered at least 49 people in attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday live-streamed footage of the assault online, leaving Facebook, YouTube and other social media companies scrambling to block and delete the footage even as other copies continued to spread like a virus. The original Facebook Live broadcast was eventually taken down, but not before its 17-minute runtime had been viewed, replayed and downloaded by users. Copies of that footage quickly proliferated to other platforms, like YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and Reddit, and back to Facebook itself. Even as the platforms worked to take some copies down, other versions were re-uploaded elsewhere. The episode underscored social media companies' Sisyphean struggle to police violent content posted on their platforms.


New Zealand bans 'abhorrent' video game seemingly based on Christchurch mass shooting

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 31 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com New Zealand has banned an "abhorrent" video game that the country's chief censor said glorifies the mass shooting at two mosques in Christchurch that killed 51 worshipers last March, according to a report. Chief Censor David Shanks said in a statement that the creators of the game set out to "produce and sell a game designed to place the player in the role of a white supremacist terrorist killer." He classified the game as objectionable, adding that in the game "anyone who isn't a white heterosexual male is a target for simply existing," Reuters reported.