From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


'A Game of Whack-a-Mole.' Why Facebook and Others Are Struggling to Delete Footage of the New Zealand Shooting

TIME - Tech

In an apparent effort to ensure their heinous actions would "go viral," a shooter who murdered at least 49 people in attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday live-streamed footage of the assault online, leaving Facebook, YouTube and other social media companies scrambling to block and delete the footage even as other copies continued to spread like a virus. The original Facebook Live broadcast was eventually taken down, but not before its 17-minute runtime had been viewed, replayed and downloaded by users. Copies of that footage quickly proliferated to other platforms, like YouTube, Twitter, Instagram and Reddit, and back to Facebook itself. Even as the platforms worked to take some copies down, other versions were re-uploaded elsewhere. The episode underscored social media companies' Sisyphean struggle to police violent content posted on their platforms.


Man in New Zealand quits his job to play Pokemon Go full-time

BBC News

A man in New Zealand has quit his job to play Pokemon Go full-time. Tom Currie worked as a barista and bartender at a seaside restaurant on the Hibiscus Coast near Auckland, but has decided to jack that in to find digital creatures on his phone instead. He says he's relying on friends and family to help out but admits his parents are "a little bit baffled". "When I resigned, I didn't tell my manager I was going out into the world to hunt Pokemon," he told Newsbeat. "But after my story got picked up I gave him a courtesy call to update him just in case the media contacted him.


UoA Game AI Group - News

AITopics Original Links

Jacky Zhen's paper Neuroevolution for Micromanagement in the Real-Time Strategy Game Starcraft: Brood War was nominated for Best Student paper at the 26th Australasian Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. AI Communications 25:19-48., has been published. The 2011 Computer Poker Competition was held at the AAAI-11 Twenty-Fifth Conference on Artificial Intelligence. Our case-based poker agent, Sartre, competed in all events this year. Once again, Sartre's performance improved since the previous year's competition, placing 2nd in four events, 4th in one event and achieving a 1st place finish in the multi-player, limit Hold'em competition.