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Tunnel collapse renews safety concerns about nuclear site

Associated Press

RICHLAND, Wash. (AP) — The collapse of an underground tunnel containing radioactive waste that forced workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation to shelter in place is the latest incident to raise safety concerns at the sprawling site that made plutonium for nuclear bombs for decades after World War II.


Tunnel collapse renews safety concerns about nuclear sites

Associated Press

RICHLAND, Wash. (AP) — The collapse of a tunnel containing radioactive waste at the Hanford nuclear weapons complex underscored what critics have long been saying: The toxic remnants of the Cold War are being stored in haphazard and unsafe conditions, and time is running out to deal with the problem.


Tunnel collapse renews safety concerns about nuclear sites

Associated Press

RICHLAND, Wash. (AP) — The collapse of a tunnel containing radioactive waste at the Hanford nuclear weapons complex underscored what critics have long been saying: that the toxic remnants of the Cold War are being stored in haphazard and unsafe conditions, and time is running out to deal with the problem.


Tunnel with WWII-era nuclear waste collapses in Washington state, prompting evacuations

The Japan Times

SPOKANE, WASHINGTON/LOS ANGELES – A portion of a tunnel containing buried rail cars full of radioactive waste collapsed Tuesday at a sprawling storage facility in a remote area of Washington state, forcing an evacuation of some workers at the site that made plutonium for nuclear weapons for decades after World War II. Officials detected no release of radiation at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation and no workers were injured, said Randy Bradbury, a spokesman for the Washington state Department of Ecology. No workers were inside the tunnel when soil collapsed 2 to 4 feet (half to 1.2 meters) over a 400 sq. The tunnels are hundreds of feet long, with about 8 feet (2.4 meters) of soil covering them, the agency said. Nearby workers were evacuated and hundreds of others farther away were told to remain indoors, the U.S. Department of Energy said.


Radioactive tunnel collapse renews safety concerns about U.S. Cold War nuke sites

The Japan Times

RICHLAND, WASHINGTON – The collapse of a tunnel containing radioactive waste at the Hanford nuclear weapons complex underscored what critics have long been saying: that the toxic remnants of the Cold War are being stored in haphazard and unsafe conditions, and time is running out to deal with the problem. "Unfortunately, the crisis at Hanford is far from an isolated incident," said Kevin Kamps of the anti-nuclear group Beyond Nuclear. For instance, at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, which opened in the 1950s and produced plutonium and tritium, the government is laboring to clean up groundwater contamination along with 40 million gallons of radioactive liquid waste stored in tanks that are decades past their projected lifespan. The job is likely to take decades. At Hanford, in addition to the tunnel collapse discovered on Tuesday, dozens of underground storage tanks, some dating to World War II, are leaking highly radioactive materials.