Ravi Balasubramanian: Robotics-Inspired Implantable Passive Mechanisms CMU RI Seminar

Robohub

Abstract: "Tendon-transfer surgeries are performed for a variety of conditions such as stroke, palsies, trauma, and congenital defects. The surgery involves re-routing a tendon from a nonfunctioning muscle to a functioning muscle to partially restore lost function. However, a fundamental aspect of the current surgery, namely the suture that attaches the tendon(s) to the muscles, can lead to poor post-surgery function. For example, in the hand tendon-transfer surgery for high median-ulnar palsy, one muscle is sutured to all four finger flexor tendons. This couples finger movement, prevents the fingers from adapting to an object's shape while grasping, and leads to poor hand function overall.


Semi-Autonomous Teleoperation of Multiple Cooperative Robots for Human-Robot Lunar Exploration

AAAI Conferences

We propose a semi-autonomous teleoperation framework, developed in (Lee & Spong 2005), as a means for robotic missions to establish infrastructure and preparations for the sustained presence of humans on the Moon. This semiautonomous framework consists of the two control loops: 1) local autonomous control and interagent communication on the Moon ensure secure cooperative manipulation of objects by the multiple slave robots regardless of communication delays and human commands; and 2) a bilateral teleoperation loop enabling a remote human operator (on the Earth, in lunar orbit, or on the Moon) to tele-control the grasped object via the delayed communication channels. This architecture will be useful for tasks requiring cooperative manipulation, such as construction of human habitats, assembly of solar photovoltaic panels, and cooperative handling of excavated rocks for in-situ resource utilization, to name a few. Simulation results are presented to highlight properties and capabilities of the proposed framework.


Video Friday: Whiskered Robot, Haptic Jamming, and Humorous Humanoid

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

ICRA is almost over, and we hope you've been enjoying our coverage, which so far has featured robot moths, zipper actuators, machine learning, and duckies. We'll have lots more from the converence over the next few weeks, but for you impatient types, we're cramming Video Friday this week with a painstakingly curated selection of ICRA videos--emphasis on pain: there were nearly 500 videos! We tried to include videos from many different areas of robotics: control, sensing, humanoids, actuators, exoskeletons, manipulators, prosthetics, aerial vehicles, grasping, AI, VR, haptics, vision, and microrobots. We're posting the abstracts along with the videos, but if you have any questions about these projects, let us know and we'll get more details from the authors. Have a great weekend everyone! We present an adaptive filter model of cerebellar function applied to the calibration of a tactile sensory map to improve the accuracy of directed movements of a robotic manipulator.


Video Friday: Skydio's Car Follow, Telexistence, and Tick-Killing Robot

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. Skydio's R1 can now follow cars, while not crashing into other stuff, of course: Telexistence thinks that having a telepresence robot that's humanoid on the other end will make it more natural to interact with, I'm guessing. And they've done a reasonable job with the design: I have to wonder what kind of latency you get between Japan and Hawaii, though.


Video Friday: Atlas Jogging, Drive.ai Launch, and Robotic Warehouse

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. Boston Dynamics posted some awesome new videos this week; the first shows Atlas jogging (!): Jogging involves a flight phase, which means that the robot is spending time completely airborne during each gait cycle. It takes much more energy to do this relative to walking, which is more like a continuous controlled fall forward.