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AI Capable of Generating Novel, Functionally Active Proteins to Speed Up Drug Development

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Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, present a way to generate synthetic proteins using Artificial Intelligence. The new approach has huge potential for developing efficient industrial enzymes as well as new protein-based medicine, such as antibodies and vaccines. Artificial Intelligence is now capable of generating novel, functionally active proteins, thanks to recently published work by researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. "What we are now able to demonstrate offers fantastic potential for a number of future applications, such as faster and more cost-efficient development of protein-based drugs," says Aleksej Zelezniak, Associate Professor at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering at Chalmers. Proteins are large, complex molecules that play a crucial role in all living cells, building, modifying, and breaking down other molecules naturally inside our cells.


ProteinGAN: A generative adversarial network that generates functional protein sequences

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Proteins are large, highly complex and naturally occurring molecules can be found in all living organisms. These unique substances, which consist of amino acids joined together by peptide bonds to form long chains, can have a variety of functions and properties. The specific order in which different amino acids are arranged to form a given protein ultimately determines the protein's 3D structure, physicochemical properties and molecular function. While scientists have been studying proteins for decades, designing proteins that elicit specific chemical reactions has so far proved to be highly challenging. Researchers at Biomatter Designs, Vilnius University in Lithuania, and Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have recently developed ProteinGAN, a generative adversarial network (GAN) that can process and'learn' different natural protein sequences.


AI Method For Generating Proteins Will Speed Up Drug Development - Pioneering Minds

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Artificial Intelligence is now capable of generating novel, functionally active proteins. Researchers are now able to demonstrate offers fantastic potential for a number of future applications, such as faster and more cost-efficient development of the protein-based drug. The new results from the Chalmers researchers represent a breakthrough in the field of synthetic proteins. They have developed an AI-based approach called ProteinGAN, which uses a generative deep learning approach. In essence, the AI is provided with a large amount of data from well-studied proteins; it studies this data and attempts to create new proteins based on it. At the same time, another part of the AI tries to figure out if the synthetic proteins are fake or not. The proteins are sent back and forth in the system until the AI cannot tell apart from natural and synthetic proteins anymore. This method is well known for creating photos and videos of people who do not exist, but in this study, it was used for producing highly diverse protein variants with naturalistic-like physical properties that could be tested for their functions.


Accelerating drug discovery from bed to benchside - Healthskouts

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Silicon Valley giant NVIDIA is teaming up with pharma company AstraZeneca and the University of Florida on new artificial intelligence research projects aimed at boosting drug discovery and patient care. April 21, NVIDIA and AstraZeneca revealed a new drug-discovery model called MegaMoIBART, which is aimed at "reaction prediction, molecular optimization and de novo molecular generation." MegaMoIBART will be deployable on NVIDIA's platform for computational drug discovery, known as Clara Discovery, and will use a new kind of technology called transformer neural networks. This is the new breed of press releases flooding the domain of drug discovery, until recently the field of pure pharma & life sciences companies, medical chemistry procedures and very time-consuming biologic research. I used to discover and develop novel candidate drugs myself.


Research on expanding DNA's alphabet finds cells are producing novel proteins

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – Scientists are expanding the genetic code of life, using man-made DNA to create a partly synthetic strain of bacteria -- and new research shows those altered microbes actually worked to produce proteins unlike those found in nature.