NAIC: Analyst I (Capital Markets) [New York, NY]

#artificialintelligence

Supports the NAIC's macro-prudential surveillance of US insurance industry assets by (a) monitoring investment markets for each of the major asset classes owned by insurers (fixed income, equities and real estate) as well as other potential markets insurers may consider for investment; (b) considering the potential risks and issues related to those investments and markets; and (c) analyzing the potential impact of adverse market conditions on US insurers' investments, individually and as a group. Demonstrates broad, innovative thinking that encompasses analyzing credit risk and other issues such as liquidity and volatility; and also takes into account portfolio and asset/liability considerations Leverages a variety of resources (i.e. industry experts, investment banking research, rating agency reports among others), with guidance identifying relevant theses, and deriving thoughtful conclusions as part of the analytical process Performs accurate and complete qualitative and quantitative analysis of investment portfolios or specific parts of an investment portfolio of insurance companies, identifying specific risks and potential concerns and any significant exposures that could impact insurer solvency Writes and interprets SQL or Access queries for standard as well as ad hoc data mining purposes. Tableau) to spot trends and anomalies as well as create unbiased stories and conclusions with data Attends conferences, webinars, seminars, NAIC continuing education courses, etc. to further knowledge of capital markets, various types of investments (i.e. Supports the NAIC's macro-prudential surveillance of US insurance industry assets by (a) monitoring investment markets for each of the major asset classes owned by insurers (fixed income, equities and real estate) as well as other potential markets insurers may consider for investment; (b) considering the potential risks and issues related to those investments and markets; and (c) analyzing the potential impact of adverse market conditions on US insurers' investments, individually and as a group. Writes and interprets SQL or Access queries for standard as well as ad hoc data mining purposes.


Deploying a windfall wisely

Los Angeles Times

Dear Liz: I recently received a $38,000 windfall. I have a student loan balance of $37,000. I want to buy a home, but I can't decide if I should have a large down payment and continue paying down student loans slowly, or make a balloon payment on my student loans and put down a smaller amount on the home. The mortgage rate would be around 4% while the student loans are at 6.55%. The price of homes in my area is at least $250,000 for a two-bedroom house (which my income supports).


Who Is Octomom? Treasury Pick Steve Mnuchin Mentions Nadya Suleman In Senate Hearing

International Business Times

The hedge fund manager and former Goldman Sachs partner was addressing concerns about subprime mortgage loans by a bank he formerly ran when the name came up. "The most troubling loan was actually to the Octomom and we worked very, very hard... to move her to another home," Mnuchin said while addressing the practice of offering subprime loans. And here is the moment a Trump cabinet nominee referenced Octomom at his confirmation hearing. In a matter of moments, the moniker "Octomom" became a nationally trending topic on Twitter. The bank in question was OneWest, which Mnuchin formed to purchase what was left of subprime lender Indy Mac from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in 2009 following the country's massive financial crisis, CNN reported last month.


Asian shares gain as Bank of Japan tweaks monetary policy

U.S. News

BANK OF JAPAN: Japan's central bank ended a policy meeting by announcing it will maneuver for better control of short-term and long-term interest rates. By pushing yields on long-term government bonds higher, the central bank is expanding investment options for institutional investors such as life insurance companies. The BOJ kept its short-term policy rate at minus 0.1 percent but said it might cut it further to encourage banks to lend more.


U.S. home construction jumps the most in 34 years

Los Angeles Times

Builders broke ground on the most new homes in nine years last month, a response to strong demand that should lift the economy. Home construction soared 25.5% to a seasonally adjusted 1.3 million in October, the Commerce Department said Thursday. That is the biggest percentage gain since July 1982. New construction is also at the highest level since August 2007, months before the Great Recession began. Americans are clamoring to buy homes, but there are few properties on the market.