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NASA shares bird's-eye-view photo of Perseverance taken by Ingenuity

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA has shared a'bird's eye view' image of the Perseverance rover, taken by the Ingenuity helicopter as it soared above the Martian surface. In a tweet, the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) team said: 'I spy with my little eye…a rover,' sharing the image with Perseverance visible in the top left corner. It was taken during the third flight of the autonomous copter that happened on April 25 and saw it fly to an altitude of 16ft and travel for 64ft before landing again. At the peak it was moving at 6.6ft per second, or 4.5 miles per hour. In contrast, the Perseverance rover, captured in the latest images, travels at 0.1 miles per hour. Ingenuity is a technical demonstration, with no science experiments on board, as it is designed to prove a flying vehicle could be used on the Red Planet.


NASA's Ingenuity helicopter prepares for its first flight

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Ingenuity, a small robotic helicopter currently attached to NASA's Perseverance rover, will attempt the first powered flight on another planet in just over a week. The 4-pound (1.8-kilogram) rotorcraft is attached to the belly of Perseverance, which touched down on Mars on February 18. Ingenuity is now'uncocooned' from its carbon-fibre shield that acted as a protective casing during landing, and is set for deployment from April 8, NASA says. Before it can track the first flight of an aircraft on the Red Planet, Perseverance needs to'drop off' Ingenuity in a clear, safe area that will become the first Martian helipad. Ingenuity carries a small amount of fabric that covered one of the wings of the Wright brothers' aircraft, known as the Flyer, during the first powered, controlled flight on Earth in 1903. A handout photo made available by NASA shows an image of NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter attached to NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. This image was acquired using the SHERLOC WATSON camera, located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, on Sol 37, the twentieth Martian day of the mission, March 28, 2021.


NASA's Ingenuity helicopter to attempt its SIXTH flight on Mars next week

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA's Ingenuity helicopter is going to attempt a sixth flight on Mars next week, reaching speeds of up to nine miles per hour and flying for over two minutes. This will be the first flight as part of the'operations demonstration phase' that includes helping the Perseverance rover in its mission to find ancient signs of life. Ingenuity will scout multiple surface features from the air during its short flight, before landing in a different airfield to the one it takes off from for the first time. It will head up 33 feet into the Martian sky and then fly 492ft southwest at about nine miles per hour, taking photographs of rocks and dunes on the ground. In this new phase, data and images from the flight will be returned to Earth in the days following the flight, rather than in the following hours as with earlier trips. NASA's Ingenuity helicopter is going to attempt a sixth flight on Mars next week, reaching speeds of up to nine miles per hour and flying for over two minutes This will be the first flight as part of the'operations demonstration phase' that includes helping the Perseverance rover in its mission to find ancient signs of life Ingenuity was designed as a technology demonstrator rather than carrying any of its own science experiments or equipment.


NASA's Ingenuity helicopter prepares for first flight on another planet in 'Wright Brothers moment'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA's Perseverance is gearing up to release the Ingenuity helicopter that will conduct the first controlled flights on another planet. Ingenuity is currently in the belly of the rover that is traveling to an'airfield' on Mars, which is deemed the perfect take-off site – a flat area with textured features to help the helicopter track its path. The deployment of Ingenuity from the belly of Perseverance will take about six sols to complete and from there the rotocopter will have to meet a series of milestones before attempting its first flight. NASA is targeting no earlier than April 8 for this event, which will see Ingenuity fly nine feet into the air, hover in place for 30 seconds and then land again on Mars' surface. And the team says if the helicopter can pull off the short flight, the entire mission will be deemed a success. If the rotorcraft lands successfully and remains operable, up to four more flights could be attempted, each one building on the success of the last.


Ingenuity has flown on Mars; what's next in NASA's Perseverance mission?

FOX News

'Gutfeld!' host is joined by Tyrus Murdoch, Katherine Timpf, Steve Hilton and Joe DeVito to discuss the latest space feat Now that NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter has completed its first test flight on the red planet, members of the agency's Southern California-based Jet Propulsion Laboratory will prepare for the next stages of their mission. Following Monday's historic event, the solar-powered rotorcraft will attempt up to four more flights during a period of fewer than 30 days. Over the next three Martian days -- also known as sols -- the helicopter's team will receive and analyze data and imagery from the first flight and devise a plan for the second experimental test, which is scheduled for no sooner than April 22. "If the helicopter survives the second flight test, the Ingenuity team will consider how best to expand the flight profile," NASA said in a Monday release. Ingenuity will conduct up to five flights, assuming NASA continues to successfully clear potential hurdles, each with chances to record additional data for future use. After Ingenuity is done, the Perseverance rover will resume its focus on surface operations.