Google hopes to thwart quantum computers from cracking today's Internet encryption

PCWorld

The encryption methods used to secure today's Internet communications won't be impenetrable forever. More powerful "quantum computers" on the horizon could very well crack them. That's why Google is testing out new cryptography that computers in the future might not be able to break. The processing power offered by "hypothetical, future" quantum computers could be enough to "decrypt any internet communication that was recorded today," wrote Matt Braithwaite, a Google software engineer in a company blog post on Thursday. This could affect the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol used when visiting websites.


Google bolsters Chrome's defenses against quantum computing attacks

PCWorld

The encryption methods used to secure today's internet communications won't be impenetrable forever. More powerful "quantum computers" on the horizon could very well crack them. That's why Google is testing out new cryptography that computers in the future might not be able to break. The processing power offered by "hypothetical, future" quantum computers could be enough to "decrypt any internet communication that was recorded today," wrote Matt Braithwaite, a Google software engineer in a company blog post on Thursday. This could affect the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol used when visiting websites.


The smart bots are coming and this one is brilliant

#artificialintelligence

Last week I hired a personal assistant named Amy Ingram. She set up four meetings for me, adding them to my calendar with the relevant contact details included. She rescheduled twice when the person I was supposed to meet had to cancel at the last minute. Instead of sending half a dozen emails per meeting, I only needed to compose one to kick things off. This all sounds like pretty simple stuff, but Amy isn't a human being: it's a virtual assistant made by the New York City startup X.ai.


Hijack A Popular Drone With A Portable Computer

Popular Science

Cheap consumer drones are really just little computers on wings. It makes sense, then, that all it takes to disable one is another cheap computer, a wi-fi connection, and some technical know-how. Brent Chapman, an Army Cyber Warfare officer, already made a tool that remotely shuts off Parrot drones. Now, at Make, he's made a full tutorial for people to make their own anti-drone kit. To follow Chapman's instructions, a person will need a Parrot AR Quadcopter 2.0, which runs about 200 new and can be found online and used for less.


This is the future of your personal digital assistant

#artificialintelligence

Of course, robots need to be good company if we are to have them in our lives, sharing our homes and workplaces, having them do things for us. And this requirement applies to all robots, not just the walking, talking ones, but also the artificial intelligence (AI) embedded in larger systems or on the web.