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Artificial Intelligence Is Rushing Into Patient Care - And Could Raise Risks

#artificialintelligence

Health products powered by artificial intelligence, or AI, are streaming into our lives, from virtual doctor apps to wearable sensors and drugstore chatbots. IBM boasted that its AI could "outthink cancer." Others say computer systems that read X-rays will make radiologists obsolete. "There's nothing that I've seen in my 30-plus years studying medicine that could be as impactful and transformative" as AI, said Eric Topol, a cardiologist and executive vice president of Scripps Research in La Jolla, Calif. AI can help doctors interpret MRIs of the heart, CT scans of the head and photographs of the back of the eye, and could potentially take over many mundane medical chores, freeing doctors to spend more time talking to patients, Topol said.


Artificial intelligence has come to medicine. Are patients being put at risk?

#artificialintelligence

Health products powered by artificial intelligence, or AI, are streaming into our lives, from virtual doctor apps to wearable sensors and drugstore chatbots. IBM boasted that its AI could "outthink cancer." Others say computer systems that read X-rays will make radiologists obsolete. "There's nothing that I've seen in my 30-plus years studying medicine that could be as impactful and transformative" as AI, said Dr. Eric Topol, a cardiologist and executive vice president of Scripps Research in La Jolla, Calif. AI can help doctors interpret MRIs of the heart, CT scans of the head and photographs of the back of the eye, and could potentially take over many mundane medical chores, freeing doctors to spend more time talking to patients, Topol said.


A reality check on artificial intelligence: Can it match the hype?

#artificialintelligence

Health products powered by artificial intelligence, or AI, are streaming into our lives, from virtual doctor apps to wearable sensors and drugstore chatbots. IBM boasted that its AI could "outthink cancer." Others say computer systems that read X-rays will make radiologists obsolete. "There's nothing that I've seen in my 30-plus years studying medicine that could be as impactful and transformative" as AI, said Dr. Eric Topol, a cardiologist and executive vice president of Scripps Research in La Jolla, Calif. AI can help doctors interpret MRIs of the heart, CT scans of the head and photographs of the back of the eye, and could potentially take over many mundane medical chores, freeing doctors to spend more time talking to patients, Topol said.


How Doctors Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Battle Covid-19

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When the Covid-19 pandemic emerged last year, physician Lara Jehi and her colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic were running blind. Who were the patients likely to get sicker? What kinds of care will they need? "The questions were endless," says Jehi, the clinic's chief research information officer. "We didn't have the luxury of time to wait and see what's going to evolve over time."


Artificial Intelligence Could Improve Health Care for All--Unless it Doesn't

TIME - Tech

You could be forgiven for thinking that AI will soon replace human physicians based on headlines such as "The AI Doctor Will See You Now," "Your Future Doctor May Not Be Human," and "This AI Just Beat Human Doctors on a Clinical Exam." But experts say the reality is more of a collaboration than an ousting: Patients could soon find their lives partly in the hands of AI services working alongside human clinicians. There is no shortage of optimism about AI in the medical community. But many also caution the hype surrounding AI has yet to be realized in real clinical settings. There are also different visions for how AI services could make the biggest impact.