Flip-flop qubits: UNSW conceives 'radical' quantum computing design

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced the invention of a "radical" architecture for quantum computing, essentially allowing quantum bits (qubits) -- the basic unit of information in a quantum computer -- to be placed hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled. The invention is based on novel "flip-flop qubits" that UNSW said promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper and easier. To operate the flip-flop qubit, researchers need to pull the electron away from the nucleus, using the electrodes at the top; doing so creates an electric dipole. The conceptual breakthrough is the creation of an entirely new type of qubit using both the nucleus and the electron. The new chip design allows for a silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches.


University of Sydney receives quantum computing grant from US intelligence

ZDNet

The University of Sydney has been awarded a slice of a multimillion dollar research grant from the United States Office of the Director of National Intelligence to advance its research in quantum computing. The undisclosed funding chunk will be injected into the Quantum Control Laboratory, which is led out of the university's month-old AU 150 million Sydney Nanoscience Hub. Additionally, an international consortium which includes the University of Sydney has also been selected by the US government-led LogiQ program to help deliver a logical quantum-bit (qubit) based on trapped ions. The LogiQ program is an initiative run by US government agency the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, which is seeking creative technical solutions to the challenge of encoding imperfect physical qubits into a logical qubit, with a quibit forming the foundations for quantum computing. According to Sydney University's associate professor Michael Biercuk, a logical qubit is considered a holy grail in quantum information.


UNSW makes atoms in silicon 'talk' in new quantum achievement

ZDNet

A scanning tunnelling microscope image showing the electron wave function of a qubit made from a phosphorus atom precisely positioned in silicon. Scientists from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced making two atom quantum bits (qubits) "talk" to each other in silicon, providing the ability to see their exact position in the solid state. The team, led by Director of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) -- and recent recipient of the Australian of the Year award -- UNSW Professor Michelle Simmons, created the atom qubits by precisely positioning and encapsulating individual phosphorus atoms within a silicon chip. The information is stored on the quantum spin of a single phosphorus electron, the university said. "In placing our phosphorus atoms in the silicon to make a qubit, we have demonstrated that we can use a scanning probe to directly measure the atom's wave function, which tells us its exact physical location in the chip.


Test results show UNSW's quantum silicon bet might pay off

ZDNet

Researchers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced the results of a test they said has brought a quantum computer closer to reality. According to UNSW, the researchers have demonstrated an integrated silicon quantum bit (qubit) platform that combines both single-spin addressability, which the university explained is the ability to write information on a single spin qubit without disturbing its neighbours, and a qubit "read-out" process, which is expected to be vital for quantum error correction. "Moreover, their new integrated design can be manufactured using well-established technology used in the existing computer industry," UNSW added. Quantum computers will require millions of connected and integrated qubits and the tests completed by the researchers have proven it is possible to correct the errors that occur in fragile quantum systems. There are five leading hardware configurations for a quantum computer, and scientists the world over are trying to determine which is going to be the winner.