Hacking the Autonomous Vehicle – InFocus Blog Dell EMC Services

@machinelearnbot

I love it when I get feedback from a blog that I've written. I appreciate the different perspectives and insights that others bring to a topic of interest. And no blog that I've written has drawn more comments than my blog, "Isaac Asimov: The 4th Law of Robotics." The section of the blog that fueled the most comments stem from a scene in the movie I, Robot where Detective Spooner (played by Will Smith) is explaining to Doctor Calvin (who is responsible for giving robots human-like behaviors) why he distrusts and hates robots. He is describing an incident where his police car crashed into another car and both cars were thrown into a cold and deep river – certain death for all occupants.


Hacking the Autonomous Vehicle @ExpoDX #AI #IoT #IIoT #M2M #Sensors #DigitalTransformation

#artificialintelligence

I love it when I get feedback from a blog that I've written. I appreciate the different perspectives and insights that others bring to a topic of interest. And no blog that I've written has drawn more comments than my blog, "Isaac Asimov: The 4th Law of Robotics." The section of the blog that fueled the most comments stem from a scene in the movie I, Robot where Detective Spooner (played by Will Smith) is explaining to Doctor Calvin (who is responsible for giving robots human-like behaviors) why he distrusts and hates robots. He is describing an incident where his police car crashed into another car and both cars were thrown into a cold and deep river – certain death for all occupants.


Hacking the Autonomous Vehicle @ExpoDX @Schmarzo #AI #IoT #M2M #Sensors #DigitalTransformation

#artificialintelligence

I love it when I get feedback from a blog that I've written. I appreciate the different perspectives and insights that others bring to a topic of interest. And no blog that I've written has drawn more comments than my blog, "Isaac Asimov: The 4th Law of Robotics."


28XuHnO

#artificialintelligence

Does the self-driving car protect its passengers at all costs with no regard for the lives of others, or should the car instead put its passengers in harm's way to avoid a higher number of casualties that could result from a collision with pedestrians or other motorists? So if there is just one passenger aboard a car, and the lives of 10 pedestrians are at stake, the survey participants were perfectly fine with a self-driving car "killing" its passenger to save many more lives in return. MIT Media Lab has developed a complimentary online "Moral Machine" game that allows you to walk through a number of scenarios of who lives and who dies when a self-driving vehicle has to make a tough call. With this all being said, we can't help but recall a rather poignant scene from the movie I, Robot, in which Detective Spooner (played by Will Smith) recalls a story of how a robot saved his life in a car crash.


Self-Driving Cars Will Likely Have To Deal With The Harsh Reality Of Who Lives And Who Dies

#artificialintelligence

While the AI present in today's experimental self-driving cars can navigate city streets, change lanes, avoid accidents and are for the most part fairly competent "drivers", what happens when it comes to an "us versus them" scenario? What if a self-driving car is presented with no-win situation -- no matter what the outcome of a collision, someone will likely die? Does the self-driving car protect its passengers at all costs with no regard for the lives of others, or should the car instead put its passengers in harm's way to avoid a higher number of casualties that could result from a collision with pedestrians or other motorists? That's the subject of a new study published in Science, entitled, "The Social Dilemma of Autonomous Vehicles." The survey results showed that people overwhelmingly decided that self-driving cars should take a "utilitarian approach" in which casualties are minimized, even it means that passengers within the car must have their lives sacrificed for the greater good.