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Voliro Hexcopter Uses Rotating Nacelles to Perform Versatile Acrobatics

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Last month, we wrote about ETH Zurich's Omnicopter, a flying cube with rotors providing thrust in lots of different directions that allow the drone to translate and rotate arbitrarily. This is very handy, for lots of different reasons, but the Omnicopter itself is rather bulky and seems destined to live out its life in a Swiss laboratory. A team of undergrads at ETH Zurich has taken the idea behind the Omnicopter and designed an even more versatile flying robot. Voliro offers the same kind of decoupled position and attitude control, except that instead of a cube full of rotors oriented in different directions, this drone uses rotating nacelles that can turn it from a traditional hexcopter into something much more versatile and acrobatic. Voliro is part of a focus project at ETH Zurich's Autonomous Systems Lab that's intended to give students in the last year of their undergraduate degrees "the opportunity to design a complete system from scratch," which seems like a fantastic way of making the transition into graduate school with some practical robotics experience.


Voliro hexacopter drone can fly in any orientation

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Multicopter drones - drones with more than two rotors - are finally able to fly in any orientation. Normally, multicopter drones can only fly parallel to the ground, but a new hexacopter drone with six propellers can tilt 360 degrees, allowing it to fly in any orientation. The drone, dubbed Voliro, can fly sideways, upside down, diagonally and in other orientations. The Voliro was developed by a team of 11 students at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) and Zurich University of the Arts (ZHDK), who spent 9 months developing a prototype of the drone. Because the drone can stay stable while flying in any configuration, it's able to fly parallel to walls.


Worldwide AI

AI Magazine

Although Switzerland is a small country, it is home to many internationally renowned universities and scientific institutions. The research landscape in Switzerland is rich, and AIrelated themes are investigated by many teams under diverse umbrellas. This column sheds some light on selected developments and trends on AI in Switzerland as perceived by members of the Special Interest group on Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science (SGAICO) organizational team, which for more than 30 years has brought together researchers from Switzerland interested in AI and cognitive science. Artificial intelligence research in Switzerland began about the same time as in other European countries. Various teams in academe and industry in Switzerland worked on practical and theoretical problems of interest to the worldwide AI community.


AI in Switzerland

AI Magazine

Although Switzerland is a small country, it is home to many internationally renowned universities and scientific institutions. The research landscape in Switzerland is rich, and AI-related themes are investigated by many teams under diverse umbrellas. This column sheds some light on selected developments and trends on AI in Switzerland as perceived by members of the Special Interest group on Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science (SGAICO) organizational team, which has brought together researchers from Switzerland interested in AI and cognitive science for over 30 years.


Zurich, The Quietly Emerging Machine Learning Hotspot

#artificialintelligence

The news of the recent Cambridge Analytica scandal did not just bring privacy concerns to the fore, it also signified how valuable a commodity data has become in today's information age. It showed us how impactful the process of leveraging data can be, and why companies across the board are adopting Machine Learning to learn from their data and completely transform their businesses. Despite the clear need, global enterprises and start-ups are struggling to scale their Machine Learning initiatives. One of the major factors limiting scale is the inability to acquire and retain the right talent. In a recent Zinnov Talent Hotbeds Forecast, we analyzed multiple cities for Machine Learning talent and predicted new hubs that would emerge over the next two decades.