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Rich people give MORE to charity when you make them feel powerful

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Appealing to rich people's desire to control events is a better tactic to get them to donate to charity, rather than their community spirit. That's the finding of a psychological study building on previous research which found that the wealthy value control more than people on lower incomes. Donations from high earners were 1.5 times larger when researchers tailored the wording of letters requesting financial support to play on this desire. Appealing to rich people's desire to control events is a better tactic to get them to donate to charity, rather than their community spirit. Experts from Harvard University wrote to 12,000 alumni of an Ivy League business school - who were earning $100,000 (£80,000) per year or more - asking them to donate to the school.


Spending Money On Time-Saving Services May Increase Happiness, Study Says

International Business Times

That has been a pertinent question since decades and more. However, a new study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that money can at least buy you extra free time which can, in turn, make you happier. Researchers claimed that instead of opting for "retail therapy" in an effort to feel better and happier, people with enough money should rather spend it on time-saving services such as paying someone else to do your chores including cleaning, shopping, household maintenance, and others alike. The new study concluded that spending money on time-saving services may result in greater life satisfaction, and thus can make you happier. Read: How Much Money Should You Have In Savings?


You actually can buy happiness--by buying time

Popular Science

I hate cleaning the bathroom. I also always feel pressed for time. So whenever I delay cleaning duty, it just means I end up feeling more stressed than ever before. But there may be a solution. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, I can buy some happiness and peace of mind...if I'm willing to pay someone else to scrub down the toilet and tub.


The hidden world under western Antarctica 800 metres beneath the ice sheet

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers have revealed what really lies under western Antarctica. They say the subglacial Lake Whillans, which lies 800 meters (2,600 feet) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is similar to a wetland. They hope by analysing the area, it could give new insight into how sea levels will rise and the ice melts due to global warming. Lake Whillans, which lies 800 meters (2,600 feet) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is similar to a wetland. The findings stem from the Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).


Pressed for time? You're not alone.

Christian Science Monitor | Science

If you feel as if there aren't enough hours in the day, you're not alone. Americans feel more pressed for time than ever, with 80% saying they lack the time to do what they want to do each day. But studies also show that leisure time has risen since the 1950s. So, if we objectively have more free time than our grandparents, why do we feel more stressed? In Episode 3 of the Monitor's six-part podcast series "It's About Time," hosts Rebecca Asoulin and Eoin O'Carroll explore why. The feeling of not having enough time is a psychological experience, says Ashley Whillans, a Harvard Business School professor who studies time and money. She says: "You could work more or less hours and feel more or less stressed." We tend to trade away our most precious resource – time – for more work and more money. But Dr. Whillans has found that those who value time over money are happier. Of course, some of us are more burdened than others. One of the world's most time-impoverished demographics is working mothers. And the COVID-19 pandemic has only made matters worse, says Leah Ruppanner, a sociology professor at the University of Melbourne. So what are some solutions?