Apple readies AI pitch to cap developer season

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The biggest names in tech are encouraging developers to build products for their app ecosystem. File photo taken in 2015 shows an illustration of an iPhone held up in front of the Apple logo. SAN FRANCISCO -- Like a dressed-down awards season, Apple's WWDC conference concludes a three-month developer season. But will it end with a bang, as the Academy Awards do for the film industry? It began with Microsoft's Build in March and continued with Facebook's F8 show in April and Google I/O in May.


The Morning After: Wednesday, May 10th 2017

Engadget

How's it gone so far? Microsoft's big annual conference kicks off today, and we've sniffed out what you can expect. We also get the full reveal of Amazon's Echo-with-a-screen. It's not pretty, but it does sound pretty smart. What to expect at Microsoft's Build 2017 conference While it's a mobile computing world, Microsoft has no shortage of projects we need to be updated on.


6 futuristic tech gifts for under $500

AITopics Original Links

NEW YORK -- This year you can purchase a bit more of the sci-fi future. Hoverboards aren't quite what the name implies, but there's bona fide virtual reality, a droid you should be looking for and a basketball that improves your free throw, all one shopping-click away. These tech gadgets make the pocket-sized computer that talks to you and dials your friends seem quaint. But don't worry, there are plenty of smartphones on sale, too. Sphero's new $150 BB-8 droid is expected to be one of the hottest Star Wars gifts this holiday season.


Xconomy: Six Useful Things You Can Do With Your New Smart Speaker

#artificialintelligence

TL;DR: It's time to buy a smart speaker. It will be a long time before they're as empathetic as Samantha in Her or as industrious as Rosie in The Jetsons. But they can already make your life easier, or at least more interesting, in a few key ways. So you might as well break down and get one.


Alexa, How Do You Really Work?

Slate

On this week's If Then, Slate's April Glaser and Will Oremus discuss the outrage at the largest TV-station owner in the country--Sinclair Broadcasting--after the media conglomerate forced its local-news anchors to read a script that echoes Trumpian talking points. They also unpack Trump's beef about Jeff Bezos owning what he calls the #AmazonWashingtonPost. Meanwhile, music streaming site Spotify went public this week in a totally new kind of way. The hosts take a look at its unorthodox move and what it means for the company's future.