Smart Cities Initiatives around the World Are Improving Citizens' Lives

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It's a fact of life that most of us are going to be living in cities. According to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 68 percent of the world's population will live in cities by the year 2050. Research by U.S.-based McKinsey & Company shows that by 2025, 600 cities around the globe will together generate 60 percent of the world's gross domestic product (GDP). Currently, there are 29 cities worldwide with populations of more than 10 million people, and cities use between 60 percent and 80 percent of the world's energy. Lighting alone accounts for up to 19 percent of the world's electricity consumption.


Pittsburgh's AI Traffic Signals Will Make Driving Less Boring

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Traffic congestion costs the U.S. economy 121 billion a year, mostly due to lost productivity, and produces about 25 billion kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions, Carnegie Mellon University professor of robotics Stephen Smith told the audience at a White House Frontiers Conference last week. In urban areas, drivers spend 40 percent of their time idling in traffic, he added. The next step is to have traffic signals talk to cars. Pittsburgh is the test bed for Uber's self-driving cars, and Smith's work on AI-enhanced traffic signals that talk with self-driving cars is paving the way for the ultimately fluid and efficient autonomous intersections.


Pittsburgh's AI Traffic Signals Will Make Driving Less Boring

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Idling in rush-hour traffic can be mind-numbing. It also carries other costs. Traffic congestion costs the U.S. economy $121 billion a year, mostly due to lost productivity, and produces about 25 billion kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions, Carnegie Mellon University professor of robotics Stephen Smith told the audience at a White House Frontiers Conference last week. In urban areas, drivers spend 40 percent of their time idling in traffic, he added. The big reason is that today's traffic signals are dumb.


Pittsburgh's AI Traffic Signals Will Make Driving Less Boring

#artificialintelligence

Idling in rush-hour traffic can be mind numbing. It also carries other costs. Traffic congestion costs the U.S. economy 121 billion a year, mostly due to lost productivity, and produces about 25 billion kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions, Carnegie Mellon University professor of robotics Stephen Smith told the audience at a White House Frontiers Conference last week. In urban areas, drivers spend 40 percent of their time idling in traffic, he added. The big reason is that today's traffic signals are dumb.


Qualcomm's road that charges electric cars on the move

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Wireless vehicle charging that could see electric cars get their batteries topped up by the roads they are driven is a step closer to reality. Smartphone chip maker Qualcomm has created a 100-metre stretch of road that sends charge to electric vehicles travelling on it, even at high speeds. The introduction of such wireless charging highways could revolutionise the electric-car market, eradicating range anxiety and the impracticality of having to stop for extended periods to recharge batteries - two of the biggest hurdles for electric vehicle adoption today. Many will compare the design to the race tracks you'll find in Scalextric toy sets The first live demonstration of the tech firm's Scalextric-like road took place last week in France. It works by linking a number of Qualcomm's'Halo' wireless charging pads - designed to charge an electric car when it's parked - into a stretch of tarmac.