Artificial Intelligence Is Far From Matching Humans, Panel Says - NYTimes.com

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence researchers are grappling with more realistic questions like whether their creations will take too many jobs from humans. Eight years after leading artificial intelligence scientists said their field did not need to be regulated, the question of government oversight has re-emerged as the technology has rapidly progressed. On Tuesday, at an event sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, legal specialists and technologists explored questions about autonomous systems that would increasingly make decisions without human input in areas like warfare, transportation and health. Still, despite improvement in areas like machine vision and speech understanding, A.I. research is still far from matching the flexibility and learning capability of the human mind, researchers at the conference said. "The A.I. community keeps climbing one mountain after another, and as it gets to the top of each mountain, it sees ahead still more mountains," said Ed Felten, a computer scientist who is a deputy chief technology officer in the Office of Science and Technology Policy.


Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking warn of artificial intelligence arms race

#artificialintelligence

Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk have joined prominent artificial intelligence researchers in pledging support for principles to protect mankind from machines and a potential AI arms race. An open letter published by the Future of Life Institute (FLI) on Monday outlined the Asilomar AI Principles--23 guidelines to ensure the development of artificial intelligence that is beneficial to humanity. For decades, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov's'Three Laws of Robotics' were a cornerstone for the ethical development of robots and artificial intelligence machines. First laid out in his 1942 short story Runaround, Asimov's three principles stated: A robot must not harm a human through action or inaction; a robot must obey humans; and a robot must protect its own existence. Each rule takes precedence over the rules that follow it in order to ensure a human's life is protected over the existence of a robot.


What do the next 20 years hold for artificial intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

Yolanda Gil, president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), discusses what it will take to move AI forward without moving safety backward. An outbreak of a highly contagious mosquito-borne virus in the U.S. has spread quickly to major cities around the world. It's all hands on deck to stop the disease from spreading–and that includes the deployment of artificial intelligence (AI) systems, which scour online news and social media for relevant data and patterns. Working with these results, and data gathered from numerous hospitals around the world, scientists discover an interesting link to a rare neurological condition and a treatment is developed. Within days, the disease is under control.


We ask the experts: will robots take over the world?

AITopics Original Links

The origins of robotics go back to the automata invented by ancient civilisations. The word robot entered our vocabulary only in 1920 with Czech writer Karel Čapek's play R.U.R (Rossum's Universal Robots). Over the past 20 years robots have been developed to work in settings that range from manufacturing industry to space. At Cambridge University, robotics is a rapidly developing field within many departments, from theoretical physics and computing to engineering and medical science. Lord Martin Rees is Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge.


What do the next 20 years hold for artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

An outbreak of a highly contagious mosquito-borne virus in the U.S. has spread quickly to major cities around the world. It's all hands on deck to stop the disease from spreading–and that includes the deployment of artificial intelligence (AI) systems, which scour online news and social media for relevant data and patterns. Working with these results, and data gathered from numerous hospitals around the world, scientists discover an interesting link to a rare neurological condition and a treatment is developed. Within days, the disease is under control. It's not hard to imagine this scenario*--but whether future AI systems will be competent enough to do the job depends in large part on how we tackle AI development today.