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Artificial Intelligence's Impact On Jobs Is Nuanced

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Well, is artificial intelligence a job-killer or not? We keep hearing both sides, from projections of doom for many professions that will necessitate things such as universal basic income to help sidelined workers, to projections of countless unfilled jobs needed to build and manage AI-powered enterprises. For a worker losing his or her job to automation, knowing that an AI programming job is being created elsewhere is of little solace. Perhaps the reality will be somewhere in between. An MIT report released at the end of last year states recent fears about AI leading to mass unemployment are unlikely to be realized. "Instead, we believe that--like all previous labor-saving technologies--AI will enable new industries to emerge, creating more new jobs than are lost to the technology," the report's authors, led by Thomas Malone, director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, conclude.


Artificial Intelligence's Impact On Jobs Is Nuanced - AI Summary

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For a worker losing his or her job to automation, knowing that an AI programming job is being created elsewhere is of little solace. "Instead, we believe that--like all previous labor-saving technologies--AI will enable new industries to emerge, creating more new jobs than are lost to the technology," the report's authors, led by Thomas Malone, director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, conclude. "Though these technologies will eliminate some jobs, they will create many others," the report's team of authors, led by BCG's Rainer Strack. "For example, eliminating 10 million jobs and creating 10 million new jobs would appear to have negligible impact. Computers tend to perform well in tasks that humans find difficult or time-consuming to do, "but they tend to work less effectively in tasks that humans find easy to do," the report notes. For a worker losing his or her job to automation, knowing that an AI programming job is being created elsewhere is of little solace. "Instead, we believe that--like all previous labor-saving technologies--AI will enable new industries to emerge, creating more new jobs than are lost to the technology," the report's authors, led by Thomas Malone, director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, conclude. "Though these technologies will eliminate some jobs, they will create many others," the report's team of authors, led by BCG's Rainer Strack. "For example, eliminating 10 million jobs and creating 10 million new jobs would appear to have negligible impact.


Digital Technology Will Eliminate Millions of Jobs But Create New Opportunities

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BOSTON--Technology is upending labor markets, and governments, companies, and individuals need to look beyond aggregate numbers and consider how individual professions will be affected. The report, titled The Future of Jobs in the Era of AI, is being released today by Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and Faethm. In the report, the authors look at a variety of factors to determine how the supply and demand for individual types of jobs will change. These include shifts in the size of national workforces due to college graduation rates, retirements, and mortality, along with technology adoption rates and the impact of COVID-19 on economic growth. The result is a highly detailed analysis for all three countries across multiple scenarios.


Study Uses Big Data to Quantify Shifting Demand for Jobs and Skills

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Technology is driving major shifts in the job market, and that will require corporations, governments, and individuals to embrace new strategies, according to a new report by Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and Burning Glass Technologies, What's Trending in Jobs and Skills, being released today. BCG and Burning Glass, a leading provider of real-time labor market information, studied 95 million online job listings in the US from 2015 through 2018. The authors analyzed the number and growth rate of job listings and skill requirements across broad sectors and within hundreds of specific job areas, as classified by the US Labor Department's O*NET occupation system. Through this analysis, the report identifies the fastest-growing jobs and the fastest-growing skills in the job market. "No other job market study to date has been as statistically extensive or exhaustive," says Rainer Strack, managing director and senior partner at BCG and a coauthor of the report.


Islamic State group 'lost quarter of territory' in 2016

BBC News

So-called Islamic State (IS) lost almost a quarter of its territory in 2016, according to new analysis. The group gave up almost 18,000 sq km (6,900 sq miles), its territory being reduced to some 60,400 sq km, just less than the size of Florida, security and defence analysts IHS Markit reported. IHS Markit predicted the recapture of Mosul by Iraqi government forces by the middle of the year. But it said the stronghold of Raqqa would be a tougher nut to crack. IHS Markit said the 23% reduction in IS-held territory in 2016 followed on from a 14% loss the year before.