Oakland-based art and tech studio takes critical look at A.I.

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is not as advanced as you may think. In the last couple of months, Microsoft has had a couple of failed attempts with artificial intelligence. The first involved an image recognition app called Fetch!, which looks at photos of dogs to identify its breed. People, of course, started to use the app to determine what breed of dog people resemble. In doing so, people began to notice that the app identified Asian people either as Pekingese or Chinese Crested dogs.


Meet the Artists Who Have Embraced Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Sam Kronick has a bunch of rocks arrayed in front of him on a raised desk in his Oakland studio. He's an artist and his plan is to sketch the rocks, but not with pen and paper. He and his artistic partner Tara Shi are going to do a 3D scan of them so that an artificial intelligence program can map their contours, learn to recognize rocks and then start generating its own craggy depictions. The project is deceptively simple: trying to get artificial intelligence to make nature art. Kronick and Shi are using a neural net, a computer program loosely modeled on biological neural systems like the human brain.


Meet the Artists Who Have Embraced Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Sam Kronick has a bunch of rocks arrayed in front of him on a raised desk in his Oakland studio. He's an artist and his plan is to sketch the rocks, but not with pen and paper. He and his artistic partner Tara Shi are going to do a 3D scan of them so that an artificial intelligence program can map their contours, learn to recognize rocks and then start generating its own craggy depictions. The project is deceptively simple: trying to get artificial intelligence to make nature art. Kronick and Shi are using a neural net, a computer program loosely modeled on biological neural systems like the human brain.


Mesmerizing GIFs Reveal the Frantic Shipping in the San Francisco Bay

WIRED

The Golden Gate Bridge is a pretty thing to gaze at, a pain in the butt to paint, and an excellent place to Instagram. But unbeknownst to most of the 40 million annual vehicles often forced to inch across the span, it also sits above a wet and whirring hive of activity, the churning economic engine that helped build the cities that surround it. Like industrious, capitalist trolls, ships bring about 35 million tons of goods through the Golden Gate every year, on their way to the eight ports of the San Francisco Bay. Heady and overwhelming stuff for anyone who bothers to really take a look. Fortunately, designer Sam Kronick, who works for the mapping platform Mapbox, has decided to help you visualize how it all goes down.


9.14: data, tech, learning; artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

D&S year 3 is underway, and we're seeking a Research Analyst for our "Reimagining Accountability" project (9/22 deadline), plus a Program Administrator (9/27 deadline). Data, Tech, Learning The Enabling Connected Learning initiative has been exploring student data collection/analysis and technological development, digging into the hype and fear around tech in education, the tangled issues of privacy, equity, and efficacy. Today we're sharing some of what we've learned so far, a bundle of primers -- The conversation around student data and "EdTech" can be contentious and complicated. We hope that the materials we're sharing can help the work of other researchers and educators tackling these issues. Why women are asking a major art and technology festival to #KissMyArs "Institutions like Ars Electronica have a tremendous opportunity to set a global example by highlighting diverse voices which run counter to the mainstream, and to open public dialogue around the problems, benefits, and tradeoffs new technology is bringing."