How data analytics is transforming the Health care industry

@machinelearnbot

With the wild expansion of public health information, we can use data analytic technique to crawl and filter out varied types of public health info data. Thanks to the data analytic methods, medical workers are able to manage large amount of unstructured data and then explore the insights from these data. Note that there are multiple channels to collecting population health information. Officially, lots of medical data now comes from the hospital information system (HIS), which includes electronic medical record system (EMRS), laboratory information system (LIS), picture archiving & communication system,(PACS), radiology information system (RIS), clinical decision support system (CDSS), etc. Apart from these data sets, many other medical care appliances can also help to record the life symptom information, like ECG data, blood oxygenation, blood pressure, pulse, and body temperature. You can even get health information from some social media platforms or search engines.


Big Data, Big Wins in Medicine at UC Health

#artificialintelligence

An ambitious University of California initiative to create a central repository for clinical data from all six UC health systems is advancing medicine and transforming the process of medical discovery itself. Speaking at UC Health Data Day in San Diego, Atul Butte, MD, PhD, chief data scientist, UC Health, described a new era in biomedical research, driven by the vast amounts of electronic medical record data. "Some are now saying the traditional scientific method of asking questions then making observations is becoming obsolete," Butte said. "We already have a data deluge." Across the UC medical centers, there are billions of data points related to patient care, stored within the UC Health Data Warehouse.


Big data, big wins in medicine

#artificialintelligence

An ambitious University of California initiative to create a central repository for clinical data from all six UC health systems is advancing medicine and transforming the process of medical discovery itself. Speaking at UC Health Data Day in San Diego, Atul Butte, M.D., Ph.D., chief data scientist, UC Health, described a new era in biomedical research, driven by the vast amounts of electronic medical record data. "Some are now saying the traditional scientific method of asking questions then making observations is becoming obsolete," Butte said. "We already have a data deluge." Across the UC medical centers, there are billions of data points related to patient care, stored within the UC Health Data Warehouse.


How big data can change intensive care

#artificialintelligence

A team of data scientists, researchers and clinicians from UNSW Sydney have won a major prize at the second annual Healthcare Artificial Intelligence Datathon held at the National University of Singapore (NUS). The two-day event – organised jointly by the National University Health System (NUHS), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and NUS – hosted more than 200 local and international data scientists and clinicians last weekend to address current problems in healthcare with the latest machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies. The joint UNSW-NUS team won first prize in the Critical Care Track, competing against eight other teams to analyse clinical data contained in the MIT/Philips eICU Collaborative Research Database, comprising information on more than 200,000 patients treated in intensive care units in US hospitals over the past five years. The UNSW-NUS team included researchers Oluwadamisola Sotade, Dr Mark Hanly and Oisin Fitzgerald from UNSW's Centre for Big Data Research in Health, Dr Tim Churches, data scientist from the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research and UNSW South Western Sydney Clinical School, and Dr Peter Straka from UNSW Mathematics and Statistics. "The installation of next-generation electronic medical records systems in ICUs and throughout hospitals enable very sophisticated machine-learning and artificial intelligence algorithms to be developed to assist busy clinicians in patient care and treatment decision making." said Dr Churches.


Apple might help bring veterans' medical records into the modern era

#artificialintelligence

Apple is reportedly in talks with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to provide veterans access to electronic medical records on the iPhone, according to a report from The Wall Street Journal. Such a deal could help Apple make significant progress in its attempts to partner with more medical institutions and turn its mobile operating system into a repository for the storing and sharing of health data. The company first began discussing the plan with the agency last year, per emails seen by the WSJ, and it's unclear how the project has since progressed. However, it appears that Apple could be tapped to migrate medical records for as many as 9 million US veterans to dedicated iOS software, in order to simplify hospital visits and potentially improve care and treatment delivery times. Apple is said to also potentially provide engineering support for the agency as part of the deal.