Dynamic Boltzmann Machines for Second Order Moments and Generalized Gaussian Distributions

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Dynamic Boltzmann Machine (DyBM) has been shown highly efficient to predict time-series data. Gaussian DyBM is a DyBM that assumes the predicted data is generated by a Gaussian distribution whose first-order moment (mean) dynamically changes over time but its second-order moment (variance) is fixed. However, in many financial applications, the assumption is quite limiting in two aspects. First, even when the data follows a Gaussian distribution, its variance may change over time. Such variance is also related to important temporal economic indicators such as the market volatility. Second, financial time-series data often requires learning datasets generated by the generalized Gaussian distribution with an additional shape parameter that is important to approximate heavy-tailed distributions. Addressing those aspects, we show how to extend DyBM that results in significant performance improvement in predicting financial time-series data.


Financial Time Series Data Processing for Machine Learning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This article studies the financial time series data processing for machine learning. It introduces the most frequent scaling methods, then compares the resulting stationarity and preservation of useful information for trend forecasting. It proposes an empirical test based on the capability to learn simple data relationship with simple models. It also speaks about the data split method specific to time series, avoiding unwanted overfitting and proposes various labelling for classification and regression.


A Model Explanation System: Latest Updates and Extensions

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose a general model explanation system (MES) for "explaining" the output of black box classifiers. This paper describes extensions to Turner (2015), which is referred to frequently in the text. We use the motivating example of a classifier trained to detect fraud in a credit card transaction history. The key aspect is that we provide explanations applicable to a single prediction, rather than provide an interpretable set of parameters. We focus on explaining positive predictions (alerts). However, the presented methodology is symmetrically applicable to negative predictions.


Predicting the Stock Market Using Machine Learning and Deep Learning

#artificialintelligence

There is not a huge difference in the RMSE value, but a plot for the predicted and actual values should provide a more clear understanding. The RMSE value is almost similar to the linear regression model and the plot shows the same pattern. Like linear regression, kNN also identified a drop in January 2018 since that has been the pattern for the past years. We can safely say that regression algorithms have not performed well on this dataset. Let's go ahead and look at some time series forecasting techniques to find out how they perform when faced with this stock prices prediction challenge. ARIMA is a very popular statistical method for time series forecasting. ARIMA models take into account the past values to predict the future values.


Sparsity-Promoting Bayesian Dynamic Linear Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Sparsity-promoting priors have become increasingly popular over recent years due to an increased number of regression and classification applications involving a large number of predictors. In time series applications where observations are collected over time, it is often unrealistic to assume that the underlying sparsity pattern is fixed. We propose here an original class of flexible Bayesian linear models for dynamic sparsity modelling. The proposed class of models expands upon the existing Bayesian literature on sparse regression using generalized multivariate hyperbolic distributions. The properties of the models are explored through both analytic results and simulation studies. We demonstrate the model on a financial application where it is shown that it accurately represents the patterns seen in the analysis of stock and derivative data, and is able to detect major events by filtering an artificial portfolio of assets.