Auschwitz asks visitors not to play 'Pokémon Go'

Mashable

The Auschwitz Memorial has asked Pokémon Go gamers not to play the popular app on its premises, saying it is "disrespectful" and "not appropriate." Today in "what the hell is wrong with people" - Playing Pokémon Go at Auschwitz? The game is now available in Germany, but not elsewhere in Europe. Some users have found a way to download the app outside of the U.S., Australia or New Zealand, where it's been available. New York magazine said the person who reported the presence of Pokémon in Auschwitz, also noted there was a "blue square thing" at the concentration camp, indicating the area is probably a PokéStop.


5 places you really shouldn't play Pokémon Go

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

"Pokemon Go," a new smartphone game based on cute Nintendo characters like Squirtle and Pikachu, has quickly became the top grossing app just days after its release. But the game's popularity has led to some bumps and bruises. People play the new game'Pokémon Go' on their smartphones in Union Square in New York City. As Pokémon Go draws gamers outdoors to catch digital monsters in the physical world, players have made friends, exercised and caught some sun. They've also ended up playing at sites where playing a fun game is morally wrong, prompting new discussions around ethics and augmented reality.


Holocaust Museum, Arlington National Cemetery Plead: No Pokémon

NPR Technology

The Pokémon Go mobile game is the top-grossing app for Android and iPhone. Today, the U.S. Holocaust Museum and Arlington National Cemetery asked people to refrain from using the game while visiting the somber sites. The Pokémon Go mobile game is the top-grossing app for Android and iPhone. Today, the U.S. Holocaust Museum and Arlington National Cemetery asked people to refrain from using the game while visiting the somber sites. Please do not catch virtual monsters among the graves of fallen soldiers.


Educators see gold in Pokémon Go

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The japanese Nintendo mobile game that uses the GPS to locate the smartphone's location, has gained a huge popularity among smartphone users and added to the value of Nintendo that partly owns the franchise enterprise that makes Pokemon. Each night this week, Kellian Adams-Pletcher and her husband Brian have looked out from their Somerville, Mass., home and seen the same thing: dozens of people, all sitting in the tiny park across the street, mobile phones in hand. The crowds are, of course, hunting for elusive digital monsters in the augmented reality game Pokémon Go. Turns out the park has four "Poké Stops," virtual hotspots where the sought-after creatures and supplies can be found. To her neighbors, this might be a nuisance.


Holocaust Museum to visitors: Please stop catching Pokemon here

Washington Post - Technology News

Almost everywhere you turn, it seems like people have their eyes glued to smartphone screens playing Pokemon Go. Since its launch last week, the app has quickly become a cultural phenomenon that has fans of all ages hunting around their neighborhoods for collectible digital creatures that appear on players' screens almost like magic as they explore real-world locations. But there's at least one place that would really like to keep Pokemon out: the Holocaust Museum. The Museum itself, along with many other landmarks, is a "PokeStop" within the game -- a place where players can get free in-game items. In fact, there are actually three different PokeStops associated with various parts of the museum.