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The Next Target for a Facial Recognition Ban? New York

WIRED

Civil rights activists have successfully pushed for bans on police use of facial recognition in cities like Oakland, San Francisco, and Somerville, Massachusetts. Now, a coalition led by Amnesty International is setting its sights on the nation's biggest city--New York--as part of a drive for a global moratorium on government use of the technology. Amnesty's #BantheScan campaign is backed by Legal Aid, the New York Civil Liberties Union, and AI For the People among other groups. After New York, the group plans to target New Delhi and Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia. "New York is the biggest city in the country," says Michael Kleinman, director of Amnesty International's Silicon Valley Initiative.


Human rights group urges New York to ban police use of facial recognition

The Guardian > Technology

Facial recognition technology amplifies racist policing, threatens the right to protest and should be banned globally, Amnesty International said as it urged New York City to pass a ban on its use in mass surveillance by law enforcement. "Facial recognition risks being weaponised by law enforcement against marginalised communities around the world," said Matt Mahmoudi, AI and human rights researcher at Amnesty. "From New Delhi to New York, this invasive technology turns our identities against us and undermines human rights. "New Yorkers should be able to go out about their daily lives without being tracked by facial recognition. Other major cities across the US have already banned facial recognition, and New York must do the same." Albert Fox Cahn of New York's Urban Justice Centre, which is supporting Amnesty's Ban the Scan campaign, said: "Facial recognition is biased, broken, and antithetical to democracy.


Human rights group urges New York to ban police use of facial recognition

The Guardian

Facial recognition technology amplifies racist policing, threatens the right to protest and should be banned globally, Amnesty International said as it urged New York City to pass a ban on its use in mass surveillance by law enforcement. "Facial recognition risks being weaponised by law enforcement against marginalised communities around the world," said Matt Mahmoudi, AI and human rights researcher at Amnesty. "From New Delhi to New York, this invasive technology turns our identities against us and undermines human rights. "New Yorkers should be able to go out about their daily lives without being tracked by facial recognition. Other major cities across the US have already banned facial recognition, and New York must do the same." Albert Fox Cahn of New York's Urban Justice Centre, which is supporting Amnesty's Ban the Scan campaign, said: "Facial recognition is biased, broken, and antithetical to democracy.


Facial recognition camera projects raise concerns in Eastern Europe

ZDNet

Two years after a mass surveillance system with thousands of facial recognition security cameras was introduced to the streets of Serbian capital Belgrade, concern continues to grow about the impact of the technology. The Huawei-based surveillance system sparked controversy when it was initially introduced in 2019. And now human and digital rights organizations in the country are pushing back and warning about the risks that facial recognition software can bring. During the summer of 2020, the SHARE Foundation, a Belgrade-based digital rights organization that advocates for data privacy and digital security, launched a website called "Thousands of cameras", as a space where Serbian citizens could share their concerns over the mass surveillance project. "The total loss of anonymity represents a certain loss of our freedom – the awareness that we are under constant surveillance drastically changes our decisions," it warns.


IBM quits facial-recognition market over police racial-profiling concerns

The Guardian

IBM is pulling out of the facial recognition market and is calling for "a national dialogue" on the technology's use in law enforcement. The abrupt about-face comes as technology companies are facing increased scrutiny over their contracts with police amid violent crackdowns on peaceful protest across America. In a public letter to Congress, IBM chief executive, Arvind Krishna, explained the company's decision to back out of the business, and declared an intention "to work with Congress in pursuit of justice and racial equity, focused initially in three key policy areas: police reform, responsible use of technology, and broadening skills and educational opportunities." The company, Krishna said, "no longer offers general purpose IBM facial recognition or analysis software. "IBM firmly opposes and will not condone uses of any technology, including facial recognition technology offered by other vendors, for mass surveillance, racial profiling, violations of basic human rights and ...