Cops' facial recognition database has half of US adults on file

Engadget

American law enforcement agencies have created a massive facial recognition database. If you're an adult in the US, you might already be in it. According to a comprehensive report by the Center for Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law, the law enforcement's database has 117 million American adults on file. The report says authorities used driver's license IDs from 26 states to build the database, which includes people who've never committed any kind of crime before. That's already a problem in and of itself, but it's compounded by the lack of oversight on how it's used.


China Facial Recognition Database Leak Sparks Fears Over Mass Data Collection

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A company that operates facial recognition systems in China has exposed the personal information of 2.5 million people after leaving a database unprotected. Facial recognition system showing a blue interface with a human head and biometrics data, with a grid of relevant points connected to facial features: used for survellaince, privacy control and identity tracking (Big Brother).Getty A company that operates facial recognition systems in China has exposed the personal information of 2.5 million people after leaving a database unprotected, it has emerged. It was discovered by Dutch cybersecurity researcher Victor Gevers, who works for the GDI Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to reporting security issues. He tweeted: "There is this company in China named SenseNets. They make artificial intelligence-based security software systems for face recognition, crowd analysis, and personal verification. And their business IP and millions of records of people tracking data is fully accessible to anyone."


Facial recognition could strike at our right to privacy

Daily Mail - Science & tech

There are few sights more dispiriting than a long queue at ticket offices or machines when you're rushing to catch a train. However, technology is now offering an ingenious solution. A facial recognition system is being developed that uses two invisible, near-infrared lights flashing at high speed to help a single camera capture a 3-D image of a face in astonishing detail. It will register the smallest details, down to tiny blemishes and wrinkles, and can recognise individuals even if they are wearing glasses or moving quickly along a platform. The image can then be checked against a customer database.


ICE Uses Facial Recognition To Sift State Driver's License Records, Researchers Say

NPR Technology

In many cases, federal agents can request access to state DMV records by filling out a form. This is an example of a Homeland Security request that was made to the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 2017. In many cases, federal agents can request access to state DMV records by filling out a form. This is an example of a Homeland Security request that was made to the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 2017. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents mine millions of driver's license photos for possible facial recognition matches -- and some of those efforts target undocumented immigrants who have legally obtained driver's licenses, according to researchers at Georgetown University Law Center, which obtained documents related to the searches.


The Implementation Of Facial Recognition Can Be Risky. Here's Why..

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Have you ever noticed your friends getting tagged automatically after you upload a group picture? Though the technology has now gained widespread attention, its history can be traced back to the 1960s. Woodrow Wilson (Woody) Bledsoe, an American mathematician and computer scientist, is one of the founders of pattern and facial recognition technology. Back in the 1960s, he developed ways to classify faces using gridlines. A striking fact was, even during the experimental and inception phase, the application was able to match 40 faces per hour.