Cops' facial recognition database has half of US adults on file

Engadget

American law enforcement agencies have created a massive facial recognition database. If you're an adult in the US, you might already be in it. According to a comprehensive report by the Center for Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law, the law enforcement's database has 117 million American adults on file. The report says authorities used driver's license IDs from 26 states to build the database, which includes people who've never committed any kind of crime before. That's already a problem in and of itself, but it's compounded by the lack of oversight on how it's used.


European Union likely to ban Facial Recognition for 5 years

#artificialintelligence

The EU (Europian Union) is considering restricting the use of facial recognition technology for a possible duration of 5 years, in public area sectors. The reason being is the regulators need some time to consider the protection of unethical exploitation of the technique. The facial recognition is a technique that lets to identify faces that are captured on camera footage to be crosschecked against real-time watchlists, mostly collected by the police. However, the restrictions for the use are not absolute as the technique can still be used for research and development, and safety purposes. The committee formulating the restriction drafted an 18-page document, which implicates the protection of privacy and security of an individual from the abuse of the facial recognition technique.


China Facial Recognition Database Leak Sparks Fears Over Mass Data Collection

#artificialintelligence

A company that operates facial recognition systems in China has exposed the personal information of 2.5 million people after leaving a database unprotected. Facial recognition system showing a blue interface with a human head and biometrics data, with a grid of relevant points connected to facial features: used for survellaince, privacy control and identity tracking (Big Brother).Getty A company that operates facial recognition systems in China has exposed the personal information of 2.5 million people after leaving a database unprotected, it has emerged. It was discovered by Dutch cybersecurity researcher Victor Gevers, who works for the GDI Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to reporting security issues. He tweeted: "There is this company in China named SenseNets. They make artificial intelligence-based security software systems for face recognition, crowd analysis, and personal verification. And their business IP and millions of records of people tracking data is fully accessible to anyone."


Facial recognition: The fight over the use of our faces is far from over

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

As police embrace new facial recognition technology, many fear false matches could lead to wrongful arrests. The fight over the use of our faces is far from done. A raging battle over controversial facial recognition software used by law enforcement and the civil rights of Americans might be heading to a courtroom. The latest salvo includes the American Civil Liberties Union suing the FBI, the Department of Justice and the Drug Enforcement Agency for those federal agencies' records to see if there is any secret surveillance in use nationwide. The lawsuit, filed Oct. 31, comes as organizations and law enforcement are going toe-to-toe over what is private and what isn't.


Facial recognition could strike at our right to privacy

Daily Mail - Science & tech

There are few sights more dispiriting than a long queue at ticket offices or machines when you're rushing to catch a train. However, technology is now offering an ingenious solution. A facial recognition system is being developed that uses two invisible, near-infrared lights flashing at high speed to help a single camera capture a 3-D image of a face in astonishing detail. It will register the smallest details, down to tiny blemishes and wrinkles, and can recognise individuals even if they are wearing glasses or moving quickly along a platform. The image can then be checked against a customer database.