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Ontologies and Semantic Annotation. Part 1: What Is an Ontology

#artificialintelligence

In the abundance of information, both machines and human researchers need tools to navigate and process it. Structuring and formalization of data into hierarchies, such as trees, may establish the relations between the data required for efficient machine processing and may make the information more readable for data analysts. Yet, in more complex domains, such as in natural language processing, relations between concepts go beyond simple hierarchies and form thesaurus-like networks. For such cases, researchers use ontologies as common vocabularies for specialists who need to share information in a domain. Ontologies were first defined as "explicit formal specifications of the terms in the domain and relations among them" (Gruber 1993) and, more specifically, "a formal, explicit specification of a shared conceptualization" (Studer et al. 1998) and are used in a number of applications, including the following, as specified by Noy and McGuinness (Noy and McGuinness 2001): Ontologies are the tools to provide comprehensive description of the domain of interest with respect to the users' needs It is something that we see when, for example, medical information is published on, several different websites.


Ontologies Come of Age

AITopics Original Links

This is an updated version of Usability Issues in Description Logic Systems'' published in Proceedings of International Workshop on Description Logics, Gif sur Yvette, (Paris), France, September, 1997.


Smart Mobility Ontology: Current Trends and Future Directions

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Ontology, as a discipline of philosophy, explains the nature of existence and has its roots in Aristotle and Plato studies on "metaphysics" (Welty and Guarino, 2001). However, the word ontology originated from two Greek words: ontos (being) and logos (word), and conceived for the first time during the Sixteen century by German philosophers (Welty and Guarino, 2001). From then till the mid-twentieth, ontology evolved mainly as a branch of philosophy. However, with the advent of Artificial Intelligence since the 1950s, researchers perceived the necessity of ontology to describe a new world of intelligent systems (Welty and Guarino, 2001). Moreover, with the development of the World Wide Web in the 1990s, ontology development got to be common among different domain specialists to define and share the concepts and entities in their fields on the Internet (Noy et al., 2001). During the last three decades, ontology development studies have evolved and shifted from theoretical issues of ontology to practical implications of the use of ontology in real-world, large-scale applications (Noy et al., 2001). Nowadays, ontology development focuses mainly on defining machine interpretable concepts and their relationships in a domain. However, ontology development also pursues other goals, such as providing a common conceptualization of the domain on which different experts agree, (Métral and Cutting-Decelle, 2011) and enable them to reuse the domain knowledge (Noy et al., 2001). It also enables researchers to easily analyze the domain knowledge and eloquently express the domain assumptions.


A Framework for Evaluating Agricultural Ontologies

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

An ontology is a formal representation of domain knowledge, which can be interpreted by machines. In recent years, ontologies have become a major tool for domain knowledge representation and a core component of many knowledge management systems, decision support systems and other intelligent systems, inter alia, in the context of agriculture. A review of the existing literature on agricultural ontologies, however, reveals that most of the studies, which propose agricultural ontologies, are lacking an explicit evaluation procedure. This is undesired because without well-structured evaluation processes, it is difficult to consider the value of ontologies to research and practice. Moreover, it is difficult to rely on such ontologies and share them on the Semantic Web or between semantic aware applications. With the growing number of ontology-based agricultural systems and the increasing popularity of the Semantic Web, it becomes essential that such development and evaluation methods are put forward to guide future efforts of ontology development. Our work contributes to the literature on agricultural ontologies, by presenting a method for evaluating agricultural ontologies, which seems to be missing from most existing studies on agricultural ontologies. The framework supports the matching of appropriate evaluation methods for a given ontology based on the ontology's purpose.


A Semantic Framework for Uncertainties in Ontologies

AAAI Conferences

We present a semantically-driven approach to uncertainties within and across ontologies. Ontologies are widely used not only by the Semantic Web but also by artificial systems in general. They represent and structure a domain with respect to its semantics. Uncertainties, however, have been rarely taken into account in ontological representation, even though they are inevitable when applying ontologies in `real world' applications. In this paper, we analyze why uncertainties are necessary for ontologies, how and where uncertainties have to be represented in ontologies, and what their semantics are. In particular, we investigate which ontology constructions need to address uncertainty issues and which ontology constructions should not be affected by uncertainties on the basis of their semantics. As a result, the use of uncertainties is restricted to appropriate cases, which reduces complexity and guides ontology development. We give examples and motivation from the field of spatially-aware systems in indoor environments.