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Microsoft bolsters cloud security with more AI threat detection

Mashable

The Satya Nadella era at Microsoft has been defined by one overarching theme: everything ties back to the cloud. Ahead of the RSA security conference, the company is once again debuting new Azure security tools to add to its enterprise threat protection arsenal. Ann Johnson, Microsoft's Corporate Vice President of Cybersecurity Solutions, announced two new services--Azure Sentinel and the Microsoft Threat Experts program--from the floor of the company's Cyber Defense Operations Center. Johnson said Azure Sentintel is "the first cloud-native SIEM [security information and event management tool] within a major cloud platform." Azure Sentinel, available in preview today, applies AI to cybersecurity by automating up to 80 percent of common security operations (SecOps) tasks, according to Microsoft.


Use modern cloud security best practices

#artificialintelligence

There are mixed opinions about whether the cloud is more secure for many organizations. The biggest difference between cloud security and traditional on-prem security is the shared responsibility model. Major cloud providers, such as AWS, Microsoft and Google, have made considerable investments to keep up with emerging security threats. They also provide an extensive identity and access management (IAM) infrastructure, but enterprises still need to do their part. "Just because you're moving your application to the cloud doesn't mean you're shifting your cybersecurity responsibility to the cloud provider," said Steve Tcherchian, chief product officer for XYPRO Technology, a security software provider.


Use modern cloud security best practices

#artificialintelligence

There are mixed opinions about whether the cloud is more secure for many organizations. The biggest difference between cloud security and traditional on-prem security is the shared responsibility model. Major cloud providers, such as AWS, Microsoft and Google, have made considerable investments to keep up with emerging security threats. They also provide an extensive identity and access management (IAM) infrastructure, but enterprises still need to do their part. "Just because you're moving your application to the cloud doesn't mean you're shifting your cybersecurity responsibility to the cloud provider," said Steve Tcherchian, chief product officer for XYPRO Technology, a security software provider.


Oracle buys DDoS software maker Zenedge

ZDNet

Oracle on Thursday announced that it's acquiring cybersecurity firm Zenedge. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.


Oracle's infrastructure business focuses on bare metal to go after AWS

PCWorld

Larry Ellison made a splash this week when he said that Oracle would give Amazon a run for its money in the cloud. Then, the company outlined the pillar of the tech titan's infrastructure offering: beefy, bare-metal servers running in the cloud. That's right: Oracle is going after a market that's full of virtualized workloads with servers that clock in with a whopping 36 physical CPU cores, according to Vice President of Engineering Don Johnson. Rather than starting from the low end of the infrastructure market and working its way up, Oracle is starting at the top and working its way down. It's a move that's aimed at power-hungry enterprise workloads that require a lot of processing power, like Oracle Database or video rendering.