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Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

#artificialintelligence

Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

#artificialintelligence

Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

#artificialintelligence

Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. Event moderated by Demis Hassabis, CEO, DeepMind of Google. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. It was a watershed moment in the history of technology: machine intelligence had arrived at the point where it could best human intellect. It wasn't a coincidence that Kasparov became the symbol of man's fight against the machines.


Garry Kasparov on intelligent machines - The Manufacturer

#artificialintelligence

Is the modern world one of man versus machine, or one where man and machine can work in harness? In 1997, the world chess champion Garry Kasparov went into battle with a chess-playing computer, Deep Blue, and lost. For many, this reinforced the perception that we are on an inexorable journey to checkmate, humanity, where we will become mere pawns in the hands of machines. However, Kasparov himself resists this gloomy narrative. It's not hard to understand why opponents found Garry Kasparov so formidable.


THINK TANK; If a Machine Creates Something Beautiful, Is It an Artist?

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Ask most chess grandmasters if chess is art and they will say unequivocally, ''Yes.'' Ask them if chess is also a sport and the answer will again be yes. But suggest that chess might be just a very complex math problem and there is immediate resistance. The question is more than academic. Beginning tomorrow in New York, Garry Kasparov, the world's top-ranked player and the former world champion, will play a $1 million, six-game match against a chess program called Deep Junior.