Artificial Intelligence: A Free Online Course from MIT

#artificialintelligence

That's because, to paraphrase Amazon's Jeff Bezos, artificial intelligence (AI) is "not just in the first inning of a long baseball game, but at the stage where the very first batter comes up." Look around, and you will find AI everywhere--in self driving cars, Siri on your phone, online customer support, movie recommendations on Netflix, fraud detection for your credit cards, etc. To be sure, there's more to come. Featuring 30 lectures, MIT's course "introduces students to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning methods of artificial intelligence." It includes interactive demonstrations designed to "help students gain intuition about how artificial intelligence methods work under a variety of circumstances."


Text Mining Support in Semantic Annotation and Indexing of Multimedia Data

AAAI Conferences

This short paper is describing a demonstrator that is complementing the paper "Towards Cross-Media Feature Extraction" in these proceedings. The demo is exemplifying the use of textual resources, out of which semantic information can be extracted, for supporting the semantic annotation and indexing of associated video material in the soccer domain. Entities and events extracted from textual data are marked-up with semantic classes derived from an ontology modeling the soccer domain. We show further how extracted Audio-Video features by video analysis can be taken into account for additional annotation of specific soccer event types, and how those different types of annotation can be combined.


Bayesball: Bayesian analysis of batting average – Towards Data Science

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One of the topics in data science or statistics I found interesting, but having difficulty understanding is Bayesian analysis. During the course of my General Assembly's Data Science Immersive boot camp, I have had a chance to explore Bayesian statistics, but I really think I need some review and reinforcement. This is my personal endeavour to have a better understanding of Bayesian thinking, and how it can be applied to real-life cases. For this post, I am mainly inspired by a Youtube series by Rasmus Bååth, "Introduction to Bayesian data analysis". He is really good at giving you an intuitive understanding of Bayesian analysis, not by bombarding you with all the complicated formulas, but by providing you with a thought-process of Bayesian statistics. The topic I chose for this post is baseball.


AlphaGo Zero demystified

#artificialintelligence

DeepMind has shaken the world of Reinforcement Learning and Go with its creation AlphaGo, and later AlphaGo Zero. It is the first computer program to beat a human professional Go player without handicap on a 19 x 19 board. It has also beaten the world champion Lee Sedol 4 games to 1, Ke Jie (number one world ranked player at the time) and many other top ranked players with the Zero version. The game of Go is a difficult environment because of its very large branching factor at every move which makes classical techniques such as alpha-beta pruning and heuristic search unrealistic. I will present my work on reproducing the paper as closely as I could.


Bayesian Learning of Generalized Board Positions for Improved Move Prediction in Computer Go

AAAI Conferences

Computer Go presents a challenging problem for machine learning agents. With the number of possible board states estimated to be larger than the number of hydrogen atoms in the universe, learning effective policies or board evaluation functions is extremely difficult. In this paper we describe Cortigo, a system that efficiently and autonomously learns useful generalizations for large state-space classification problems such as Go. Cortigo uses a hierarchical generative model loosely related to the human visual cortex to recognize Go board positions well enough to suggest promising next moves. We begin by briefly describing and providing motivation for research in the computer Go domain. We describe Cortigo’s ability to learn predictive models based on large subsets of the Go board and demonstrate how using Cortigo’s learned models as additive knowledge in a state-of-the-art computer Go player (Fuego) significantly improves its playing strength.