We Need a Disney Princess to Explain How We Got So Hung Up on Disney Princesses

Slate

There are three things the internet will seemingly never tire of: cute animals, bad takes, and Disney princesses. The popularity of each of these is rooted in updatability: We enjoy (or suffer through) an inexhaustible supply of adorable critters, an unavoidable string of dubious opinions, and ever-shifting forms of desirable femininity. The outrage from the anti-choice right that followed was understandable enough. The top Google autocomplete results for "Disney princesses as" are moms, mermaids, sloths, queens, guys, warriors, anime, babies, and the hilarious "lukewarm bowls of water." A frighteningly high percentage of Tumblr and DeviantArt's servers seem to be dedicated to hosting amateur drawings of Disney princesses, where they become online dolls that artists can dress up in different costumes.


What can modern girls learn from Disney princesses?

BBC News

A slim figure, housework skills, and the need to be rescued by a man are some of the attributes often associated with Disney princesses. But behind the clichés, the characters can also demonstrate determination, compassion, ambition - and fearlessness. The England women's football team believes the traits of Disney princesses are exactly what you need to be come a successful player. The Football Association (FA) has joined with Disney on a campaign that focuses on the character's strong attributes - to encourage more young females into football. Striker Nikita Parris said: "My favourite Disney princess is Ariel from The Little Mermaid because she was fearless.


Disney just redefined what it means to be a modern-day princess

Mashable

Once upon a time, Disney princesses were best known for their picture-perfect good looks, their pretty dresses and their inevitable happy endings alongside a handsome prince. Disney has teamed up with thousands of British parents to figure out the traits of a modern-day princess in order to make its heroines relevant, modern role models. Disney commissioned parenting expert Judy Reith to analyse the characteristics of Disney princesses, from Tangled's Rapunzel to Belle from Beauty and the Beast. A long list of the princesses' attributes and principles were put to a panel of 5,000 parents who were asked to rank the qualities they deemed most relevant and important to their 6- to 12-year-old daughters. The number one principle of a modern princess, according to parents, was "care for others", followed by "live healthily" at number two and "don't judge a book by its cover" at number three.


Fictional Disney characters can 'promote negative female stereotypes'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Disney princesses such as Elsa from Frozen can damage young girls' body esteem, research suggests. Fictional characters beloved by generations of cinema goers actually promote negative female stereotypes by indoctrinating little girls at an early age, the study claims. Elsa in Frozen has an unrealistically thin waist like many Disney princesses over the years, including her sister Anna, Jasmine from Aladdin, Ariel from The Little Mermaid, Cinderella and Snow White. Elsa in Frozen has an unrealistically thin waist like many Disney princesses over the years, including her sister Anna, Jasmine from Aladdin (pictured), Ariel from The Little Mermaid, Cinderella and Snow White. While many parents dismiss the films and merchandise as harmless, scientists said such things reinforce unhelpful stereotypes.


Could Disney princesses HARM your child?

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The rise of the Disney Princess has been astonishing - with everything from toys to theme parks showing off the characters. But as magical as these characters may seem, new research suggests they influence preschoolers to be more susceptible to potentially damaging stereotypes. A new study reveals that the more interactions with Disney Princess a child had predicted more female gender-stereotypical behavior a year later. As magical as Disney Princess characters may seem, new research suggests they influence preschoolers to be more susceptible to potentially damaging stereotypes. A new study reveals more interactions with the princesses predicted more female gender-stereotypical behavior a year later.