CBRE Acquires Floored: Real Estate Tech Poised For A Big 2017

Forbes - Tech

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. The author is a Forbes contributor. The opinions expressed are those of the writer. CBRE, the largest commercial real estate company in the world, made an interesting acquisition last week. The mega property development, management, and financing firm purchased Floored, a technology startup focused on interactive 3D imaging.


The Smart Cities of the Future Are Already Taking Off

#artificialintelligence

By 2040, about two-thirds of the world's population will be concentrated in urban centers. Over the decades ahead, 90 percent of this urban population growth is predicted to flourish across Asia and Africa. Already, 1,000 smart city pilots are under construction or in their final urban planning stages across the globe, driving forward countless visions of the future. As data becomes the gold of the 21st century, centralized databases and hyper-connected infrastructures will enable everything from sentient cities that respond to data inputs in real time to smart public services that revolutionize modern governance. Connecting countless industries--real estate, energy, sensors and networks, and transportation, among others--tomorrow's cities pose no end of creative possibilities and stand to completely transform the human experience.


The Smart Cities of the Future Are Already Taking Off

#artificialintelligence

By 2040, about two-thirds of the world's population will be concentrated in urban centers. Over the decades ahead, 90 percent of this urban population growth is predicted to flourish across Asia and Africa. Already, 1,000 smart city pilots are under construction or in their final urban planning stages across the globe, driving forward countless visions of the future. As data becomes the gold of the 21st century, centralized databases and hyper-connected infrastructures will enable everything from sentient cities that respond to data inputs in real time to smart public services that revolutionize modern governance. Connecting countless industries--real estate, energy, sensors and networks, and transportation, among others--tomorrow's cities pose no end of creative possibilities and stand to completely transform the human experience.


The BACTERIA that could mean the end of the pothole

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers are developing self-repairing materials to solve the problem of cracks and potholes in roads. Some of the solutions include asphalt with steel fibers that can close small cracks when heat is added, and concrete with special bacteria inside that can fill cracks as they emerge. These solutions could help make driving conditions safer, as poorly maintained roads can contribute up to 14,000 highway fatalities every year. While asphalt is mainly used to build roads because it's easy to apply, it's also porous, a quality which absorbs some road noise, but also makes the material less durable, resulting in cracks and potholes. But Dr Erik Schlangen, a materials scientist at Delft University in the Netherlands, told The Verge that a self-healing asphalt material he's been working on could be a solution to this problem.


Planes may soon have SELF-HEALING wings: Breakthrough material clots like blood to help surfaces repair themselves

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Tiny cracks on the wings of aircraft can lead to jets being grounded at a cost of millions of pounds. But British chemists have a solution - a self-healing compound that could enable wings to heal themselves in a similar way to how human skin repairs itself. The compound could also be used to make mobile phone screens that fix themselves and hardy nail polish where chips are automatically repaired. British chemists have created a self-healing compound that could enable wings to heal themselves in a similar way to how human skin repairs itself. The research, carried out at the University of Bristol, is said to have'started on the back of an envelope' as the team looked at ways to prevent tiny cracks from forming in places such as aircraft wings.