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Russia: Our Killer Robots Don't Need Any Pesky International Laws

#artificialintelligence

United Nations delegates are currently meeting to debate possible regulations controlling autonomous killer robots -- but Russia is having none of it. The Russian delegate, representing a country that has already developed and deployed military robots in real-world conflicts, remained steadfast that the global community doesn't need any new rules or regulations to govern the use of killer robots, The Telegraph reports. That pits Russia against much of the rest of the international community, who are calling for rules to keep humans in charge of the decision to open fire, highlighting on the main anxieties and ethical conundrums surrounding autonomous weaponry. The argument from Russia is that the AI algorithms driving these killer robots are already advanced enough to differentiate friend from foe from civilian, and that therefore there's no need to burden the autonomous death machines with unnecessary regulations. "The high level of autonomy of these weapons allows [them] to operate within a dynamic conflict situation and in various environments while maintaining an appropriate level of selectivity and precision," the delegate said, according to The Telegraph.


International Robot Exhibition 2017

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Toyota's third-generation humanoid T-HR3 robot is remotely controlled by a an employee at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 29, 2017.



Highlights From the International Robot Exhibition 2013

AITopics Original Links

The theme for this year's International Robot Exhibition (IREX) in Tokyo was "Making a Future with Robot." We're not exactly sure what that means, but we're definitely in favor of it, and here are some of the coolest things that we saw. There's one caveat with our IREX coverage, and that's the fact that there was a bit of a language barrier going on most of the time. With the exception of some big international robotics companies, there simply wasn't a lot of information available on many of the robots that we saw. We're following up as best we can, but in the meantime, enjoy this highlight video and gallery that we've put together for you.


Systems of natural-language-facilitated human-robot cooperation: A review

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Natural-language-facilitated human-robot cooperation (NLC), in which natural language (NL) is used to share knowledge between a human and a robot for conducting intuitive human-robot cooperation (HRC), is continuously developing in the recent decade. Currently, NLC is used in several robotic domains such as manufacturing, daily assistance and health caregiving. It is necessary to summarize current NLC-based robotic systems and discuss the future developing trends, providing helpful information for future NLC research. In this review, we first analyzed the driving forces behind the NLC research. Regarding to a robot s cognition level during the cooperation, the NLC implementations then were categorized into four types {NL-based control, NL-based robot training, NL-based task execution, NL-based social companion} for comparison and discussion. Last based on our perspective and comprehensive paper review, the future research trends were discussed.