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Google Accelerates Quantum Computation with Classical Machine Learning

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Tech giant Google's recent claim regarding quantum supremacy created a buzz in the computer science community and got global mainstream media talking about quantum computing breakthroughs. Yesterday Google fed the public's growing interest in the topic with a blog post introducing a study on improving quantum computation using classical machine learning. The qubit is the most basic constituent of quantum computing, and also poses one of the most significant challenges for the realization of near-term quantum computers. Various characteristics of qubits have made it challenging to control them. Google AI explains that issues such as imperfections in the control electronics can "impact the fidelity of the computation and thus limit the applications of near-term quantum devices."


Roadmap for 1000 Qubits Fault-tolerant Quantum Computers - Amit Ray

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How many qubits are needed to out-perform conventional computers, how to protect a quantum computer from the effects of decoherence and how to design more than 1000 qubits fault-tolerant large scale quantum computers, these are the three basic questions we want to deal in this article. Qubit technologies, qubit quality, qubit count, qubit connectivity and qubit architectures are the five key areas of quantum computing are discussed. Earlier we have discussed 7 Core Qubit Technologies for Quantum Computing, 7 Key Requirements for Quantum Computing. Spin-orbit Coupling Qubits for Quantum Computing and AI, Quantum Computing Algorithms for Artificial Intelligence, Quantum Computing and Artificial Intelligence, Quantum Computing with Many World Interpretation Scopes and Challenges and Quantum Computer with Superconductivity at Room Temperature. Here, we will focus on practical issues related to designing large-scale quantum computers.


Quantum Computing Update: 53-Qubit Simulator, Superconducting Interconnects Bring Future Computers Closer

International Business Times

They are billed as machines that will change the future, but quantum computers themselves are still in the future. All the same, scientists have been working on developing a working quantum computer for years now, and the frenzied competition to be the first has yielded a new record -- a 53-qubit quantum simulator.


Best-yet quantum simulator with 53 qubits could really be useful

New Scientist

That might not sound like much, but in the quantum computing arms race, several groups are edging past one another as they aim to eventually make a universal quantum computer. A group of researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute has created a quantum simulator using 53 quantum bits, or qubits. Earlier this month, IBM announced a 50-qubit prototype, though its capabilities are unclear. With this 53-qubit device, the researchers have done scientific simulations that don't seem to be possible


How quantum computing will change the world

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In 1972, at the age of ten, I spent a week somewhere near Windsor – it's hazy now – learning how to program a computer. This involved writing out instructions by hand and sending the pages to unseen technicians who converted them into stacks of cards punched with holes. The cards were fed overnight into a device that we were only once taken to see. It filled a room; magnetic tape spooled behind glass panels in big, grey, wardrobe-sized boxes. The next morning, we'd receive a printout of the results and the day would be spent finding the programming faults that had derailed our calculations of pi to the nth decimal place.