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The story behind Uber's and Lyft's successes in Sacramento

Los Angeles Times

Uber and Lyft seem to be conquering California politics. In just the last month, the ride-hailing giants have secured a string of victories at the Capitol, killing or delaying legislation and regulations they didn't like and shepherding in new rules favorable to the industry. The companies are also resolving high-profile court cases that challenged how they hire drivers -- without hurting their shared core position that drivers aren't their employees. These successes come as Uber and Lyft are dominating the market in California, transporting millions of passengers each month while taxi trips are dropping precipitously. Here are four reasons why the ride-sharing companies are winning in Sacramento and what their victories might mean for their drivers and customers.


Uber and Lyft are winning at the state Capitol - here's why

Los Angeles Times

Uber and Lyft seem to be conquering California politics. In just the last month, the ride-hailing giants have secured a string of victories at the Capitol, killing or delaying legislation and regulations they didn't like and shepherding in new rules favorable to the industry. The companies are also resolving high-profile court cases that challenged how they hire drivers -- without hurting their shared core position that drivers aren't their employees. These successes come as Uber and Lyft are dominating the market in California, transporting millions of passengers each month while taxi trips are dropping precipitously. Here are four reasons why the ride-sharing companies are winning in Sacramento and what their victories might mean for their drivers and customers.


With deceit and arrogance, Uber keeps finding new ways to shoot itself in the foot

Los Angeles Times

The ride-hailing company with a glittering informal valuation of $70 billion shot itself in the foot on Saturday, public-image-wise, by apparently sending drivers to New York's Kennedy airport during a one-hour taxi drivers' strike staged to protest President Trump's immigrant and refugee ban. That action, in which Uber announced it would suspend "surge" charges on Kennedy airport trips during the strike, provoked thousands of Uber users to adopt the "#DeleteUber" hashtag on Twitter, signifying that they were removing the company's ride-ordering app from their smartphones. Hours later, Uber was backpedaling furiously, tweeting that the firm had not been trying to break the strike. Chief Executive Travis Kalanick subsequently announced a $3-million defense fund for Uber drivers caught in Trump's immigration net and issued a bland statement about Trump's executive order that stopped short of actually criticizing it. He merely observed that "allowing people from all around the world to come here and make America their home has largely been the U.S.'s policy since its founding."


Uber's rocky year: Travis Kalanick's resignation is just the latest thing

Los Angeles Times

Uber's rocky year: Travis Kalanick's resignation is just the latest thing Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick resigned as chief executive of the ride-hailing giant Wednesday, pushed out by investors just a week after he announced he was going on an indefinite leave of absence. The San Francisco startup, valued at near $70 billion, has been rocked this year by allegations of a corrosive culture that allowed sexual harassment and other bad behavior to go unchecked for years. Uber drivers have their say about Kalanick's resignation Column: With Travis Kalanick out, we'll see the real value of Uber -- and it won't be pretty Column: With Travis Kalanick out, we'll see the real value of Uber -- and it won't be pretty Facing mounting investor pressure brought on by a torrent of scandals, Travis Kalanick, co-founder and chief executive of ride-hailing company Uber, resigned -- just a week into a leave of absence meant to quell concerns about his management style. The New York Times reported that five of Uber's major investors demanded Kalanick's immediate resignation because the company needed a change in leadership. Kalanick reached his decision to resign after hours of talks with some of the investors.


Yes, Uber has lost ridership to Lyft during this crisis

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Uber's discrimination investigation recommends dozens of reforms within their company walls. A sign marks a pick-up point for the Uber car service at LaGuardia Airport in New York on March 15, 2017. Travis Kalanick, the combative and embattled CEO of ride-hailing giant Uber, resigned June 20, 2017 under pressure from investors at a pivotal time for the company. SAN FRANCISCO -- In the tumultuous months leading up to Uber CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick's resignation, the ride-hailing company lost U.S. market share and saw its brand image tarnished, most notably by a former engineer's blog post blasting the ride-hailing company for its sexist work environment. Among several surveys tracking the company's decline: one based on credit card spending, which found over the past two years, Uber's share of rides has dropped to 75% from 90%, according to TXN Solutions.