Belgian researchers say AI could improve accuracy of diagnosing lung disease

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Researchers at the University of Leuven in Belgium said a study they conducted showed artificial intelligence could help interpret, and thereby improve, lung function tests used to diagnose long-term lung disease. Results of the study were presented Monday at the European Respiratory Society's International Congress. As part of the study, the researchers used data from 968 people who were undergoing complete lung function testing for the first time. Using a concept called "machine learning", they developed an algorithm that takes into account routine lung function parameters and clinical variables of smoking history, body mass index, and age to make a suggestion for the most likely diagnosis. "We have demonstrated that artificial intelligence can provide us with a more accurate diagnosis in this new study," Wim Janssens, senior author of the study, said.


How big data is used in weather forecasting, diabetes management

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Since the dawn of man, we have always been looking for ever more accurate methods of solving problems. The rise of big data has certainly been a big help. Typhoon forecasts and the treatment of diabetes, though totally unrelated, are two examples of how technology can make a big difference. The Chinese word for typhoon was first used in the late Ming Dynasty. In the old days, people used wind direction and abnormal animal behavior, such as deep-water fish coming near the shore, to forecast the arrival of a storm.


Emerging Applications for Intelligent Diabetes Management

AAAI Conferences

Diabetes management is a difficult task for patients, who must monitor and control their blood glucose levels in order to avoid serious diabetic complications. It is a difficult task for physicians, who must manually interpret large volumes of blood glucose data to tailor therapy to the needs of each patient. This paper describes three emerging applications that employ AI to ease this task and shares difficulties encountered in transitioning AI technology from university researchers to patients and physicians.


Diabetes revolution: Artificial pancreas could spell the end of finger pricks and injections within two years

Daily Mail - Science & tech

An artificial pancreas which allows diabetes sufferers to lead'normal lives' could be available within two years. Scientists have developed an iPhone-sized device which monitors patients' blood sugar levels and automatically injects the right levels of insulin. The revolutionary product attaches to the wearer's clothing from where it monitors glucose levels and provides insulin when required through patches on the skin. It could prove a lifeline for around 350,000 Britons who suffer from Type 1 diabetes – a lifelong condition where the pancreas stops producing insulin. Currently, patients must inject themselves with insulin up to five times a day to avoid serious health problems.


Emerging Applications for Intelligent Diabetes Management

AI Magazine

It is a difficult task for physicians, who must manually interpret large volumes of blood glucose data to tailor therapy to the needs of each patient. This paper describes three emerging applications that employ AI to ease this task: (1) case-based decision support for diabetes management; (2) machine-learning classification of blood glucose plots; and (3) support vector regression for blood glucose prediction. The first application provides decision support by detecting blood glucose control problems and recommending therapeutic adjustments to correct them. The second provides an automated screen for excessive glycemic variability. The third aims to build a hypoglycemia predictor that could alert patients to dangerously low blood glucose levels in time to take preventive action.