Trump, G7 Peers Seek Deals on Terrorism, Trade, Climate

U.S. News

Activists wearing the masks of the seven leaders of G7, from left, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Italian Premier Paolo Gentiloni, British Prime Minister Theresa May, U.S. President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, sit at a table eating mock pasta during an initiative by Oxfam, an international confederation of NGOS aimed at fighting poverty, ahead of the G7 summit scheduled for May 26 and 27 in Taormina, Italy, Thursday, May 25, 2017.


G7 leaders pressure tech firms on removing terror propaganda

AP World Headlines

From left, President Donald Trump, European Council President Donald Tusk, British Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni watch an Italian flying squadron as part of activities at the G7 Summit in Taormina, Sicily, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. From left, President Donald Trump, European Council President Donald Tusk, British Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni watch an Italian flying squadron as part of activities at the G7 Summit in Taormina, Sicily, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. From left, Britain's PM Theresa May, President of the EU Council Donald Tusk, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Italian PM Paolo Gentiloni, France President Emmanuel Macron, and Canadian PM Justin Trudeau walk to their first meeting after the welcome ceremony of the leaders of the G7 countries summit in the Sicilian citadel of Taormina, Italy, Friday, May 26, 2017. Activists wearing the masks of the seven leaders of G7, from left, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Italian Premier Paolo Gentiloni, British Prime Minister Theresa May, U.S. President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, sit at a table eating mock pasta during an initiative by Oxfam, an international confederation of NGOS aimed at fighting poverty, ahead of the G7 summit scheduled for May 26 and 27 in Taormina, Italy, Thursday, May 25, 2017.


This Photo Tells You Everything You Need to Know About Trump's Presence at the G7 Summit

Mother Jones

On Saturday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel's official Instagram account posted a picture from what her office described simply as a "spontaneous meeting between two working sessions" from the Group of 7 nations summit in Quebec City this weekend where President Donald Trump: railed against "ridiculous and unacceptable" trade tariffs on American goods; threatened to quit all trade with his G7 counterparts while also proposing the complete elimination of tariffs on all goods and services; blamed former President Obama for Russia's 2014 invasion of Ukraine; and made a curious prediction involving his "touch" and his "feel" for his upcoming meeting with North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un. Angela Merkel's office has released this photo taken today at the G7, which tells you a lot about how things went. The image of Trump--surrounded by British Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emmanuel Macron, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe--sparked a lively discussion on social media when Buzzfeed News' David Mack posted it to Twitter, writing, "tells you a lot about how things went." "This looks like an intervention," wrote one Twitter user. "This isn't WWII, they're allies…does he not remember that?" wrote another.


Dutch election: European relief as mainstream triumphs

BBC News

European leaders have welcomed the result of the Netherlands election, which saw the anti-immigration party of Geert Wilders fail to become the largest in parliament. Prime Minister Mark Rutte's centre-right VVD won by some margin. For Francois Hollande of France it was a "clear victory against extremism", while German Chancellor Angela Merkel hailed a "good day for democracy". The vote was closely watched ahead of elections in France and Germany. The Netherlands was seen by many as a bellwether for how populist parties will perform in those polls.


Italy Says Brexit Is Great Opportunity for Europe

International Business Times

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi told parliament on Monday that Britain's vote to leave the European Union could be a "great opportunity" for the rest of the bloc to make long-needed changes. Speaking before flying to Berlin to meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande, Renzi said the EU must now focus "a bit more on social issues and a bit less on bureaucratic ones." The referendum outcome strengthened the arguments for reform that Italy had often put forward to its partners, and these now had a greater chance of success, Renzi said. Several top Italian officials have made clear they see the outcome of the British referendum offering opportunities for Italy, especially by allowing it to spend more without falling foul of EU budget deficit limits. Economy Minister Pier Carlo Padoan warned on Saturday the referendum would probably weaken Italy's already listless economic growth and hit its public finances.